Windows 7 end of life

DaveH

Striker
All software is insecure, a lot of hardware too, but because windows is so widespread the return on investment for people finding exploits is a lot higher than say on linux where there are fewer devices that you could infect.
I think that was a line first trotted out by Bill Gates, around the time he was calling linux a small cult. It was bollocks then and bollocks now. The vast majority of web servers (especially e-commerce servers) run on linux and apache. Most viruses and hacks now are about stealing private data, credit card details etc. It makes all those web servers a massive and attractive target, yet hardly any malware exists. there is not the same level of protection in windows as you get in linux.


It comes down to the roots of the OS. Windows started as a home/office PC tool in the days before networking was common place. It was for one person to use at a time and had virtually no security and no protection. Users could fiddle with each other’s files or core OS files. That has got tighter as the years have gone on but some fundamental access issues still exist. Even in Windows 10, I’m pretty sure an ordinary user can write to the program files directory. Old habits die hard and many users run as administrators all the time - though I appreciate that is a user not OS issue.

Linux grew as a PC version of UNIX, taking a lot from the likes of Solaris (the backbone of the banking sector for decades) and big mainframes going back to the late 60s. It was designed to be networked and designed to be multi-user. As such, ordinary users could only write to their own home directory. They could not alter OS executable files, config etc, because you didn’t want users messing things up for others. Although probably an unintended side effect, it means someone who runs a virus, leaves it with only the users home directory to infect. It has nowhere to live and nowhere to go. That makes linux more secure just on the basic principals of how the OS works.
My first machine had 1Mb ram, 20Mb Hard drive running windows 3.1.Gannin back a while now though, just gonna have to bite the bullet and upgrade my Win 7 32bit PC to Win 10 64bit using tunstall birdman's method.Take about 1 week of preparation at least, just to source hardware drivers and software.Can you use old dodgy apps on win10? Photoshop, Office etc.
Back everything up and if you can, clone the hard disk.

I have an old netbook I use for astronomy stuff (small, great battery life etc) and does not really access the internet. I could not get graphics drivers so the upgrade shafted it. Luckily I still had the old hard disk from before I upgraded it to SSD, so could clone it back over. It fell over a lot trying to do 5 years of updates though!
 
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My first machine had 1Mb ram, 20Mb Hard drive running windows 3.1.Gannin back a while now though, just gonna have to bite the bullet and upgrade my Win 7 32bit PC to Win 10 64bit using tunstall birdman's method.Take about 1 week of preparation at least, just to source hardware drivers and software.Can you use old dodgy apps on win10? Photoshop, Office etc.
If your P.C is 32 bit, only download the 32 version, not the 64 bit. It may run of 64 bit but you may encounter issues? The old dodgy apps should still be fine on the upgrade.
 
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SAFC2403

Winger
I really hope anyone using XP in the workplace is doing it on a secure network away from internet access - surely asking for trouble.

My last job on my first day i did a tour of the building and i came across a windows XP machine - they were using it with bespoke code that handled decrypting files with credit card info in it. I knew then it was going to be a pain in the arse job straight away! turned out to be true - manager walked off site after 3 weeks of me being there leaving me in the lurch to try and piece together a very bespoke network set up!!
 

PTR

Striker
My first machine had 1Mb ram, 20Mb Hard drive running windows 3.1.Gannin back a while now though, just gonna have to bite the bullet and upgrade my Win 7 32bit PC to Win 10 64bit using tunstall birdman's method.Take about 1 week of preparation at least, just to source hardware drivers and software.Can you use old dodgy apps on win10? Photoshop, Office etc.
If I were you, I'd do the upgrade pronto and find the drivers afterwards - unless you want to be hacked with a 0-day.
As to your final question, yes. Win10 is not that different to 7 really.
If your P.C is 32 bit, only download the 32 version, not the 64 bit. It may run of 64 bit but you may encounter issues? The old dodgy apps should still be fine on the upgrade.
I can't imagine any CPU capable of running Win10 would be lacking 64 bit support. On the other hand, I'm not sure if the free upgrade path allows you to go from 32 to 64 bit versions?
I really hope anyone using XP in the workplace is doing it on a secure network away from internet access - surely asking for trouble.
100% No internet connection whatsoever on the entire domain, and USB devices fully locked out. The only way data gets on is via CD/DVD, and only to a very very small number of approved people who know what they are doing.

Which is why XP is actually fine, in some use-cases tbh. Only that the hardware tends to be beyond horrific.
 
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chopperrus

Midfield
Horizon is VDI (Virtual Desktop). Cracking product, giving Citrix a right good kicking. WS1 is the bit that will be managing all your devices, apps etc.
We are trying to implement a citrix VDI solution to some of our customers but we are having issues. One is that each site has one VDI and a printer/scanner attached. We have never managed to get it to scan directly to the VDI or anywhere else so it seemed. Would Horizon be able to do that?

Cheers
 
We are trying to implement a citrix VDI solution to some of our customers but we are having issues. One is that each site has one VDI and a printer/scanner attached. We have never managed to get it to scan directly to the VDI or anywhere else so it seemed. Would Horizon be able to do that?

Cheers
Typically scanner (or printer) redirection allows you to scan from your local PC running the VDI agent. So the device attached to your local PC can print where you are even though the VDI host may be in a remote location or even a cloud hosted data centre.

Some further info

 

chopperrus

Midfield
Typically scanner (or printer) redirection allows you to scan from your local PC running the VDI agent. So the device attached to your local PC can print where you are even though the VDI host may be in a remote location or even a cloud hosted data centre.

Some further info

Cheers for that, I will pass it on to the IT bod (who is well out of his depth with all this stuff)
 

bonnylad

Midfield
If your P.C is 32 bit, only download the 32 version, not the 64 bit. It may run of 64 bit but you may encounter issues? The old dodgy apps should still be fine on the upgrade.
My Win 7 is 32bit, my PC is self built about 7yrs ago but hardware is fairly capable (AMD FX8350 CPU, 8G RAM graphics ASUS HD7850, 250GB SSD + 12 HDD)
with Windows Experience Index of 7.8.Motherboard can handle 64bit with UEFI bios.It can run SKYRIM on full bore so not too shabby.:)
 

Maxnormal

Midfield
My Win 7 is 32bit, my PC is self built about 7yrs ago but hardware is fairly capable (AMD FX8350 CPU, 8G RAM graphics ASUS HD7850, 250GB SSD + 12 HDD)
with Windows Experience Index of 7.8.Motherboard can handle 64bit with UEFI bios.It can run SKYRIM on full bore so not too shabby.:)
Mu owld 8-ish year old HP650 laptop has 8gb and an i3. Nee ssd yet but does 64bit fine. Whole process took about 8 hours including the old defrag and scan disk.
 

bonnylad

Midfield
Mu owld 8-ish year old HP650 laptop has 8gb and an i3. Nee ssd yet but does 64bit fine. Whole process took about 8 hours including the old defrag and scan disk.
Expecting a lot longer than that, just by the amount of software and hardware. E-mails setup, browser bookmarks, 12 Hard Drives, 55 program shortcuts on my desktop, hardware drivers etc
Major undertaking with probably loads of gotchas, f*ckin microsoft only reason they moved to WIN 10 was to profiteer from software sales, they could have kept WIN 7 going for years yet.If the useless ***** properly developed software to make it too difficult to hack, there wouldn't be a problem. Rant over, dreading the next week or so wish me luck.:mad:
 

PTR

Striker
My Win 7 is 32bit, my PC is self built about 7yrs ago but hardware is fairly capable (AMD FX8350 CPU, 8G RAM graphics ASUS HD7850, 250GB SSD + 12 HDD)
with Windows Experience Index of 7.8.Motherboard can handle 64bit with UEFI bios.It can run SKYRIM on full bore so not too shabby.:)
Why on earth are you running a 32bit version of Windows? You know that means you can only use 4Gb of that RAM, don't you?

But yes, your PC is absolutely fine. I had an 8320 oc'd to 4.4Ghz for years, it was great.
 
Today is the day a lot of us who work in IT have been working hard to be ready for. Windows 7 goes end of life today. If you haven’t updated to windows 10 (or 8 🤦‍♂️) you will stop receiving security updates from today.

What this means is that it will continue to work, but will quickly become insecure. Due to similarities between versions of Windows a security update released for win8/10 could hand a vulnerability for windows 7 on a plate for hackers.

If you insist on continuing to use it due to old hardware or applications then don’t do anything that could be exploited like important data or online banking.

information from Microsoft can be found at
My work system computer is running on Windows 7 ultimate, I'm guessing that falls under this particular remit? I'll see if I can swap my computer for a one upstairs which would hopefully have more up to date software 👍
 

anth

Winger
My work system computer is running on Windows 7 ultimate, I'm guessing that falls under this particular remit? I'll see if I can swap my computer for a one upstairs which would hopefully have more up to date software 👍
yup, all versions of Windows 7. Can you not update it to windows 10?
 

makum102

Winger
I read last night that if you use the media creation tool from a Win 7 or 8 PC, you can still create the Win10 image and use your existing Win7/8 product code to activate it. ONLY if you use the upgrade option.

Microsoft aren't telling people about this, but the reality is that they want people on the Win10 ecosystem more than they want the £10 for a licence key.

Also, you could use a virtual Win7 install to run your VHS app, on a fully-updated Win10 PC.
This ^ Basically when Microsoft ended the free upgrade they 'forgot' to switch it off. Works if you have a legit Win 7 licence. Media Tool Upgrade Install will issue a Win 10 key and auto validate it for you.
 

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