The Death of Original Cinema

Son of Stan

Striker
I wish Sunderland had a Tyneside Cinema or similar independent place.

It has more charm than a big chain and still shows films from years ago and has different themes for films being shown.
I'm based in Newcastle and frankly if it's not on at the Tyneside I don't go to see it as I find the alternative too depressing. Fortunately for me I can't think of anything I've missed out on and the last time I had to go to elsewhere was for X-Men: Days of Future Past.
 

Ken Tishtown

Goalkeeper
Original films are shit

If you take away the fact the originality, they're just a re-hash of the same old shit. Boring.
 

Tommasi

Striker
I only ever gan to the pictures to watch block busters anyway, anything a bit more low key what's the problem watching it in the house? You don't exactly need to watch a Ken Loach fillum in IMAX do you?
 

The Cabbage

Striker
Nolan’s next one is going to be one of the most expensive original movies ever made. He wouldn’t have been given that opportunity of it wasn’t for Batman.
 

UZZA_SPARTA

Midfield
Although I agree that the lack of original films over recent years or decades is disappointing, I also find it a bit ironic that the latest Tarantino film (Once Upon a Time in Hollywood) is being used as an example of a so called original film or idea when Tarantino is a bit of a re-packager or dare I say copyist with a lot of his films?
I do like Tarantino, would even consider myself a big fan, BUT he isn't exactly original is he?
Kill Bill (heavily influenced by kung-fu films and spaghetti westerns from the 60's and 70's), Django Unchained (influenced heavily by original Django by Sergio Corbucci, and even the Trinity westerns from the early 70's), Hateful Eight (opening influenced by the first spaghetti western in the snow: The Great Silence, by coincidence also from Corbucci, along with a Morricone soundtrack) and now with Once Upon a Time in Hollywood... 2 things sprang to mind with me: the title; 'Once Upon a Time' had been used 3 times previously by Sergio Leone, .. and the film... anybody ever heard of the Oscar nominated film The Stunt Man? ;)

The Stunt Man is a great film, was eventually released in 1980 although conceived and heavily influenced by 70's cinema... in fact, you could even say that the film director Richard Rush used to make exploitation movies back in the 70's that probably had major influence on Tarantino!? ... The Stunt Man had 3 Oscar nominations (film, story and Peter O' Toole as lead actor)… the stuntman character called Cameron (a pun on the 'camera on' term in film making - command by a director) was played by the actor Steve Railsback… a role wanted at the time by likes of Martin Sheen and Jeff Bridges.... but here another coincidence or weird fact behind the casting of Railsback in lead role was that director Richard Rush had been impressed with his performance in Emmy awards nominated Tv series Helter Skelter (mid 70's) in which Railsback had played the character of Charles Manson! :eek: :lol:

at least The Stunt Man was an original movie.. even if it was made 40 years ago

 
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Although I agree that the lack of original films over recent years or decades is disappointing, I also find it a bit ironic that the latest Tarantino film (Once Upon a Time in Hollywood) is being used as an example of a so called original film or idea when Tarantino is a bit of a re-packager or dare I say copyist with a lot of his films?
I do like Tarantino, would even consider myself a big fan, BUT he isn't exactly original is he?
Kill Bill (heavily influenced by kung-fu films and spaghetti westerns from the 60's and 70's), Django Unchained (influenced heavily by original Django by Sergio Corbucci, and even the Trinity westerns from the early 70's), Hateful Eight (opening influenced by the first spaghetti western in the snow: The Great Silence, by coincidence also from Corbucci, along with a Morricone soundtrack) and now with Once Upon a Time in Hollywood... 2 things sprang to mind with me: the title; 'Once Upon a Time' had been used 3 times previously by Sergio Leone, .. and the film... anybody ever heard of the Oscar nominated film The Stunt Man? ;)

The Stunt Man is a great film, was eventually released in 1980 although conceived and heavily influenced by 70's cinema... in fact, you could even say that the film director Richard Rush used to make exploitation movies back in the 70's that probably had major influence on Tarantino!? ... The Stunt Man had 3 Oscar nominations (film, story and Peter O' Toole as lead actor)… the stuntman character called Cameron (a pun on the 'camera on' term in film making - command by a director) was played by the actor Steve Railsback… a role wanted at the time by likes of Martin Sheen and Jeff Bridges.... but here another coincidence or weird fact behind the casting of Railsback in lead role was that director Richard Rush had been impressed with his performance in Emmy awards nominated Tv series Helter Skelter (mid 70's) in which Railsback had played the character of Charles Manson! :eek: :lol:

at least The Stunt Man was an original movie.. even if it was made 40 years ago

Fantastic post btw
 

Tex

Striker
Disgusting, isn't it? Nothing is sacred anymore.
I thought it was shite first time around but how can they remake it in the modern world? They’re gonna have to come up with some nifty plot device to avoid the obvious ‘why can’t the lad just call his parents’ mobiles and tell them they’ve left him behind?’
 

RedFlag1308

Winger
There's loads of amazing, new, original cinema out there. You just have to dig a little deeper.
Yep, it’s still vibrant with loads of outstanding stuff coming from Europe and Asia. Don’t get me wrong cinema took a huge hit when the Tories decimated the British film council. In collaboration with Film4 they would churn out incredible films almost monthly, but there is a lot of brilliant things about right now.

Just remember, the dumbest buy the mostest.
 

Lexingtongue

Striker
I thought it was shite first time around but how can they remake it in the modern world? They’re gonna have to come up with some nifty plot device to avoid the obvious ‘why can’t the lad just call his parents’ mobiles and tell them they’ve left him behind?’
Omish parents away on their horse and cart?
Yep, it’s still vibrant with loads of outstanding stuff coming from Europe and Asia. Don’t get me wrong cinema took a huge hit when the Tories decimated the British film council. In collaboration with Film4 they would churn out incredible films almost monthly, but there is a lot of brilliant things about right now.

Just remember, the dumbest buy the mostest.
Where are you finding the Asian stuff? Used to love my Asian cinema but struggle to discover it these days. Netflix doesn't seem to have a great deal?
 
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