The Death of Original Cinema

So if Lion King is being classed as an animation rather than live action because of it's CGI effects, why aren't all of the Marvel and Star Wars films being classed the same as they are CGI'd to fuck.
 

Lexingtongue

Striker
There's loads of amazing, new, original cinema out there. You just have to dig a little deeper.
You could go and see those kinds of films at the cinema once. Now they get limited releases at niche screens or cinemas don't take risks on them meaning you are hard pushed to get the cinema experience you once enjoyed so much. It's much nicer than spending hours trawling through the muck on Netflix in the hope of finding the one recent release that might be half decent.
 
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Spenny

Striker
Could not agree more. It's all special effects and far fetched shite. Not been to a cinema for a good few years now. Gave it up when the main attraction became popcorn and the inevitable snooze.
 
This,same as people who so there's no good music,its still there but you have to look for it
With music, that generally means that people are only hearing things on Radio 1, tinpot local commercial radio or peak time TV. For cinema (as in going to the cinema not films watched at home), it's a bit different as there's less freedom to dig deep, geographical practicalities enter the equation.
 
1959 - 18 out of the top 20 are new films, there are 2 remakes.

1969 - 19 out of 20 are new films, with one Bond sequel the non-new film.

1979 - 15 out of 20. Starting to see more sequels, and turning TV shows into films.

1989 - 14 out of 20 but there were a few more sequels and franchise films just outside.

1999 - 12 out of 20, with some sequels and remakes just missing out

2009 - 8 out of 20

2018 - 3 out of 20

It’s less remakes nowadays and more sequels and franchises. Like people say there’s actually a ton of good new stuff out there but it’s harder and harder to get to see it at your local cinemas.
 

bobster999

Subs Bench
Could not agree more. It's all special effects and far fetched shite. Not been to a cinema for a good few years now. Gave it up when the main attraction became popcorn and the inevitable snooze.

last time I was at a cinema was two weeks ago but that was to see the premiere of my mates film at the tyneside cinema. last time i was at a commercial cinema was years ago. i cant stand superhero films or films that rely on so much cgi it might as well be an animation.
 

conrad

Midfield
Cinema ticket price is a pisstake. Plus £4.10 for a drink, nee alcohol in it either...
People are less likely to risk seeing something ‘new’ with the gamble of cost of going to the cinema involved.
Netflix changed the game
 
1959 - 18 out of the top 20 are new films, there are 2 remakes.

1969 - 19 out of 20 are new films, with one Bond sequel the non-new film.

1979 - 15 out of 20. Starting to see more sequels, and turning TV shows into films.

1989 - 14 out of 20 but there were a few more sequels and franchise films just outside.

1999 - 12 out of 20, with some sequels and remakes just missing out

2009 - 8 out of 20

2018 - 3 out of 20

It’s less remakes nowadays and more sequels and franchises. Like people say there’s actually a ton of good new stuff out there but it’s harder and harder to get to see it at your local cinemas.
I did a quick check of my three local cinema options to see what they're showing today:

Picturehouse - 6 of 8 films are original/new cinema (including two documentaries), the others are The Lion King and the final cut of Apocalypse Now (the re-release/re-cut thing is still bif in cinema.
The Light - 2 original films (assuming we don't count Playmobil - The Movie). The rest are all sequels, franchises and remakes (plus Apocalypse Now).
Vue - There's the usual franchise films/sequels etc. and AC final cut but, for a multiplex, not so bad for original films with 6 of them, albeit three are late night showings only and one has Costner doing the voice of a dog.
 

Dave Herbal

Striker
Cinema ticket price is a pisstake. Plus £4.10 for a drink, nee alcohol in it either...
People are less likely to risk seeing something ‘new’ with the gamble of cost of going to the cinema involved.
Netflix changed the game
Get an unlimited card, don’t buy drinks, take your own booze in.

I’ve just solved al your problems in one sentence man.
 
I did a quick check of my three local cinema options to see what they're showing today:

Picturehouse - 6 of 8 films are original/new cinema (including two documentaries), the others are The Lion King and the final cut of Apocalypse Now (the re-release/re-cut thing is still bif in cinema.
The Light - 2 original films (assuming we don't count Playmobil - The Movie). The rest are all sequels, franchises and remakes (plus Apocalypse Now).
Vue - There's the usual franchise films/sequels etc. and AC final cut but, for a multiplex, not so bad for original films with 6 of them, albeit three are late night showings only and one has Costner doing the voice of a dog.
They're definitely out there, but they're just not being shown to or seen by as many people.

Added complication for me is my wife (no) is an absolute demon for discounts and loyalty points, and one of our insurance memberships gives you free cinema tickets but only at Cineworld or Vue. She simply won't go to a cinema where we both pay for our tickets and a lot of the indie stuff just isn't getting shown at the multiplexes
 
They're definitely out there, but they're just not being shown to or seen by as many people.

Added complication for me is my wife (no) is an absolute demon for discounts and loyalty points, and one of our insurance memberships gives you free cinema tickets but only at Cineworld or Vue. She simply won't go to a cinema where we both pay for our tickets and a lot of the indie stuff just isn't getting shown at the multiplexes
Ah, that would be a pain as the multiplexes, when they show indie films, tend to stick them on late at night, during the working day or as one off evening showings on the non two for one nights.
 

Struts

Midfield
Cinema ticket price is a pisstake. Plus £4.10 for a drink, nee alcohol in it either...
People are less likely to risk seeing something ‘new’ with the gamble of cost of going to the cinema involved.
Netflix changed the game
Odeon sells drink
 

Ciro_DiMarzio

Full Back
Looking forward to seeing once upon a time in Hollywood. I only really see films with the kids at the cinemas these days. I have found lots. Of good films I've never heard of just looking through IMDB then sourcing them online. Another reason for there being less original films is that there are so many good TV series out there now with huge budgets.
 

Tex

Striker
1959 - 18 out of the top 20 are new films, there are 2 remakes.

1969 - 19 out of 20 are new films, with one Bond sequel the non-new film.

1979 - 15 out of 20. Starting to see more sequels, and turning TV shows into films.

1989 - 14 out of 20 but there were a few more sequels and franchise films just outside.

1999 - 12 out of 20, with some sequels and remakes just missing out

2009 - 8 out of 20

2018 - 3 out of 20

It’s less remakes nowadays and more sequels and franchises. Like people say there’s actually a ton of good new stuff out there but it’s harder and harder to get to see it at your local cinemas.
You’ve put this up before Cockers. Worserer than I would have guessed and utterly depressing.
 

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