University lecturers strikes

At Oxford we are striking for general conditions, like the rest of the nation, but the real reason is the pension deficit. I'm not on strike. My primary role is healthcare and we simply can't take that away. Having said that, on the whole the reasons seem justified.
 


Hep

Winger
Conditions doesn't refer to how comfy your chair is or how high they set the thermostat man. :lol:
No moral dilemma as far as I can see. How can you possibly resent anyone simply trying to defend their agreed contract terms?
Very easily, if the contract terms are no longer solvent, something has to give.
At Oxford we are striking for general conditions, like the rest of the nation, but the real reason is the pension deficit. I'm not on strike. My primary role is healthcare and we simply can't take that away. Having said that, on the whole the reasons seem justified.
Who do you want to make up the deficit?
 

DaveH

Striker
The last strike there was a picket line at the library.

I'd support her if she withdrew her labour but I wouldn't be happy if she stopped students from going to the library. She wouldn't do that anyway because she isn't a selfish twat.
How did you feel about the miners strikes? Selfish twats too?
 

googleboogle

Midfield
From past experience half the staff on strike will go on the piss and lie bed the best day. To cold for them to be standing on a picket line.
 

mickb2112

Winger
Bit of a moral dilemma here and I was interested in peoples thoughts. My daughter is doing her degree at Lancaster University and in her final year. Tuition fees 9,250 per year and she has really enjoyed her time at uni but it has been littered with lecturer strikes. I don't know that much about how worthy their cause is but I understand it is to do with a negative impact to their pay and conditions/pensions at a time when universities are getting loads of money. Anyway my daughter and hundreds of thousands of other students have had their studies effected a lot and their next planned strike is likely to be the longest and will last weeks right up to the time when my daughter submits her final work for her degree. In short she will have paid the neck end of £30,000 in tuition fees, missed loads of weeks of tuition and the biggest impact right at the end of her final year which is bound to impact on her grade and maybe her chances in life.

Should I be angry or understanding? If angry who at, the universities or the striking lecturers? If I (or my daughter) complains who should I complain to? Does this impact on anyone else on here?
My two are at uni at the moment too and facing strikes. I`m both angry and sympathetic. I don`t want their education being disrupted especially when they are paying so much but I sympathise with their cause. It`s always those at the coal face getting their terms and conditions cut and always at a time when those at the top are getting more and more on the basis that you need to pay top salaries to attract the top candidates. There`s always a bucketful of money to line the pockets at the top but always penny pinching for those actually doing the work. No wonder they feel the need to stand up and kick against it.
Very easily, if the contract terms are no longer solvent, something has to give.

Who do you want to make up the deficit?
Pay those at the top considerably less for starters. Cap the pay of fund managers and put more money into the pension funds. Ensure more of the efficiency savings/growth in GDP over the last 40 years goes to the workers and not into the pockets of the super rich. There`s more than enough money in the system, it`s just concentrated in too few hands. But this is the system they want as it keeps the rich, rich.
 
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How did you feel about the miners strikes? Selfish twats too?
No not at all, and I don't know how you can compare the two tbh.
If you're a lecturer yourself and supposed to be intelligent I'm struggling to understand how you can't get your head around the fact I couldn't give a fuck about them withdrawing their labour and cancelling the 16 hours a week they grace my daughter with their presence - it's the fact they picket the library to stop her going in to research for her dissertation.
 

Pop

Striker
My two are at uni at the moment too and facing strikes. I`m both angry and sympathetic. I don`t want their education being disrupted especially when they are paying so much but I sympathise with their cause. It`s always those at the coal face getting their terms and conditions cut and always at a time when those at the top are getting more and more on the basis that you need to pay top salaries to attract the top candidates. There`s always a bucketful of money to line the pockets at the top but always penny pinching for those actually doing the work. No wonder they feel the need to stand up and kick against it.

Pay those at the top considerably less for starters. Cap the pay of fund managers and put more money into the pension funds. Ensure more of the efficiency savings/growth in GDP over the last 40 years goes to the workers and not into the pockets of the super rich. There`s more than enough money in the system, it`s just concentrated in too few hands. But this is the system they want as it keeps the rich, rich.
So the old chestnut of make anyone but us pay, seems reasonable.
 

mickb2112

Winger
So the old chestnut of make anyone but us pay, seems reasonable.
Not really, just a bit of fairness for those actually doing the job not getting their terms and conditions slashed while those above them continue to see their pay and rewards increase tenfold. What would your solution be???
 

DaveH

Striker
No not at all, and I don't know how you can compare the two tbh.
If you're a lecturer yourself and supposed to be intelligent I'm struggling to understand how you can't get your head around the fact I couldn't give a fuck about them withdrawing their labour and cancelling the 16 hours a week they grace my daughter with their presence - it's the fact they picket the library to stop her going in to research for her dissertation.
I'm not a lecturer or academic.

Could it not be the case that they are not expecting sufficient staff to be able to staff the library and has to close it.

Are you sure they are closing it? Edinburgh have not announced formally the impact of the recent round of strikes. Last time round the library remained open according to this:
[/URL]
 

bobster999

Central Defender
Took a few seconds of googling.


"It is important to know that all staff will not take part in the strike - this means the impact will vary across the university, which will remain open throughout this period, including the library, colleges and student services".


 
I'm not a lecturer or academic.

Could it not be the case that they are not expecting sufficient staff to be able to staff the library and has to close it.

Are you sure they are closing it? Edinburgh have not announced formally the impact of the recent round of strikes. Last time round the library remained open according to this:
[/URL]
I've explained a couple of times already, at the last strike they picketed the library and she felt intimidated and didn't want to cross the line. She going to see her tutors this morning to see if they will extend the deadline for her submission.
So the old chestnut of supporting people's right to fight for their terms and conditions until it effects me?
It's quite a serious effect if it effects my daughters final grade, do you not think? Or does her future not matter?
 
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bobster999

Central Defender
I've explained a couple of times already, at the last strike they picketed the library and she felt intimidated and didn't want to cross the line. She going to see her tutors this morning to see if they will extend the deadline for her submission.

It's quite a serious effect if it effects my daughters final grade, do you not think? Or does her future not matter?

i very much doubt that staff did that. theyd get in serious trouble for stopping students going about their business. has she not just left the work too late to do?
 

DaveH

Striker
I've explained a couple of times already, at the last strike they picketed the library and she felt intimidated and didn't want to cross the line. She going to see her tutors this morning to see if they will extend the deadline for her submission.

It's quite a serious effect if it effects my daughters final grade, do you not think? Or does her future not matter?
It might differ from place to place. I know there were lines of protesting staff at various points where I worked last time. I generally went to chat to them, took a leaflet, agreed with them but said I was not in the union so couldn't strike and walked through. Obviously if they are deliberately blocking access and not just congregating there, then it might be different.
 

Mackem00

Striker
I've explained a couple of times already, at the last strike they picketed the library and she felt intimidated and didn't want to cross the line. She going to see her tutors this morning to see if they will extend the deadline for her submission.

It's quite a serious effect if it effects my daughters final grade, do you not think? Or does her future not matter?
Of course it does. As does the lecturers pay and conditions. Both are being compromised by the university. How long are they striking for at her university?
 
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Pop

Striker
So the old chestnut of supporting people's right to fight for their terms and conditions until it effects me?
If people want to fight for their rights that is fine, no issues with that.

When the the pushback is 'he is minted, make him pay', I don't agree with that.

Defined benefit schemes are astronomically expensive just to run, that is before you take any deficits into account. There has to be a reasonable discussion from both sides about sustainability for both the employer an employee.
Not really, just a bit of fairness for those actually doing the job not getting their terms and conditions slashed while those above them continue to see their pay and rewards increase tenfold. What would your solution be???
From a financial perspective are they striking about anything other than pensions? I presume those at the top will also be losing access to the same pension scheme?

Just had a look, employee contributions have gone from 8% to 9.6%, that is still extremely good value for the benefit they will be receiving and in my eyes a marginal increase. I imagine the employer contribution will be somewhere in the region of 25% before any deficit funding contributions they will also be making.
 
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Hammer

Winger
If people want to fight for their rights that is fine, no issues with that.

When the the pushback is 'he is minted, make him pay', I don't agree with that.

Defined benefit schemes are astronomically expensive just to run, that is before you take any deficits into account. There has to be a reasonable discussion from both sides about sustainability for both the employer an employee.


From a financial perspective are they striking about anything other than pensions? I presume those at the top will also be losing access to the same pension scheme?

Just had a look, employee contributions have gone from 8% to 9.6%, that is still extremely good value for the benefit they will be receiving and in my eyes a marginal increase. I imagine the employer contribution will be somewhere in the region of 25% before any deficit funding contributions they will also be making.
Employer contribution is about 20% including deficit funding contributions (the 9.6% includes deficit funding contributions as well). No one at the top is in USS, they’ll all be receiving additional pay in lieu of pension contributions.
If people want to fight for their rights that is fine, no issues with that.

When the the pushback is 'he is minted, make him pay', I don't agree with that.

Defined benefit schemes are astronomically expensive just to run, that is before you take any deficits into account. There has to be a reasonable discussion from both sides about sustainability for both the employer an employee.


From a financial perspective are they striking about anything other than pensions? I presume those at the top will also be losing access to the same pension scheme?

Just had a look, employee contributions have gone from 8% to 9.6%, that is still extremely good value for the benefit they will be receiving and in my eyes a marginal increase. I imagine the employer contribution will be somewhere in the region of 25% before any deficit funding contributions they will also be making.
These strikes are about general conditions though, not USS specifically.
 
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