Indoor plants.

I have 9 Tillandsias or Air-Plants and one baby one experts call a "pup" that grew from the base of the parent plant.

I also have a Dionaea Muscipula or Venus Fly Trap which I bought at the Beetham garden center in Cumbria close to the border with Lancashire. Doing really well. May get some live mealworms to feed it. You can get them from any aquatic shop.
 

OOOSH YEAH

Midfield
I have 9 Tillandsias or Air-Plants and one baby one experts call a "pup" that grew from the base of the parent plant.

I also have a Dionaea Muscipula or Venus Fly Trap which I bought at the Beetham garden center in Cumbria close to the border with Lancashire. Doing really well. May get some live mealworms to feed it. You can get them from any aquatic shop.
Any pics mate? Sounds like you’re a dab hand.
 
Really impressive those. They’re presented nice in their pots too.
They aren't 'pots' per se. There is no soil. The middle one is just a glass ornament I got for £2 at the Seaham Car Boot Fair. I took pebbles from Marsden Beach outside of The Grotto pub and low and behold the glass looks like a wave going over stones.

I have more.




This one is an actual clam shell found in the back garden. It was filthy. Full of dirt and dead woodlice and shit. So I steeped it in washing up liquid and bleech and scrubbed it and scrubbed it till it was clean. The plant is my first one I bought. The stones are from the back garden so the only cost is the plant.


 
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OOOSH YEAH

Midfield
They aren't 'pots' per se. There is no soil. The middle one is just a glass ornament I got for £2 at the Seaham Car Boot Fair. I took pebbles from Marsden Beach outside of The Grotto pub and low and behold the glass looks like a wave going over stones.

I have more.




This one is an actual clam shell found in the back garden. It was filthy. Full of dirt and dead woodlice and shit. So I steeped it in washing up liquid and bleech and scrubbed it and scrubbed it till it was clean. The plant is my first one I bought. The stones are from the back garden so the only cost is the plant.


Again all very nice. You obviously have a talent for this. Wish mine looked as good. I’ll keep my eye out for nicer pots or ornaments to put them in. Mine tend to be quite big though.
 
Again all very nice. You obviously have a talent for this. Wish mine looked as good. I’ll keep my eye out for nicer pots or ornaments to put them in. Mine tend to be quite big though.






Saved the best till last. Incredible to think this could be the only one in existence and I got it. A glass bowl blown to fit over a bit of wood. I wish I was an inch tall coz I would be able to imagine myself in the woods or something.
 
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Excellent. Where did you get the moss? I’ve been thinking of having my bonsai base around a bed of moss
When I go to that 'holiday let' home in the south of Cumbria the lady who runs it gave it to me. She gave me quite a big bag of it which is in a plastic bag in a biscuit tin in the garage.

I used to do Bonsai but was never any good. Though I do have a Pyrocantha growing and a Juniper in the ground to let the trunk thicken.
 

OOOSH YEAH

Midfield
When I go to that 'holiday let' home in the south of Cumbria the lady who runs it gave it to me. She gave me quite a big bag of it which is in a plastic bag in a biscuit tin in the garage.

I used to do Bonsai but was never any good. Though I do have a Pyrocantha growing and a Juniper in the ground to let the trunk thicken.
Well they look great mate
 

Kevj

Striker
Growing conditions
Acorns need cool conditions in order to be able to begin to grow (germinate). Follow the instructions below to plant your acorns and then place the pots outside where they can be watered by the rain.
When to grow
Collect some acorns from mid-September to December. Don’t let the acorns dry out. Make sure you collect acorns in good condition, they should be green or brown in colour with no holes where insects may have burrowed inside, the caps should come off easily.
What you need
  • Gardening gloves
  • 15cm (6in) pots with drainage holes
  • Multi-purpose compost
  • Trowel
  • Acorns
  • Plant label
How to grow
  1. Loosely fill the pot with compost leaving around a 2.5cm (1in) gap between the compost and the top of the pot.
  2. Make four spaced holes at the edge of the pot with your finger and put an acorn in to each hole. Gently cover over the acorns with the compost.
  3. Water the pot and place it outside, you may need to protect the acorns from animals and birds.
  4. The seedlings can be kept in this pot until the roots begin to emerge out of the drainage holes, when it can be potted on to a slightly larger pot. Tall pots are better than squat ones, to allow the roots to elongate. Repeat this as often as necessary.
  5. The saplings may be kept in pots for two or three years, but if you find that it becomes too much to keep putting them in bigger pots, you can then think about a place to plant them in the ground.
I found this on the RHS website, it was in the kids section, so apologies if it is too simplified.
From eight seeds which were planted, one has germinated and I now have the makings of my first oak bonsai. I’d hoped to have a few in case any died on the way, but over the moon there’s one has sprouted.
 

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