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Grief pops up in strange ways

Discussion in 'SMB' started by foolzy, Nov 13, 2017.

  1. foolzy

    foolzy Winger

  2. Son of Stan

    Son of Stan Winger

    http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-41962459
    I read this earlier. I know exactly what she means. I've been in M&S many times at Christmas and looked at men's jumpers without even thinking - as that's what I always bought Dad. I've even heard him say 'You don't need to buy me anything' as he usually did. It's coming up to 10 years since he died (the day after Boxing Day) and sometimes it just hits you like a lead weight. Grief is a strange thing.
     
  3. Keawyeds

    Keawyeds Striker

    Could have been worse. She could have been reminded of her Da in the S&M department.
     
  4. Trauntrian

    Trauntrian Midfield

    Very rarely get the bus any more, but when I do and it goes past the old allotments, I still glance across expecting the see my Granddad in his flat cap pottering about. :cry:
     
    Coeus likes this.
  5. becs

    becs Striker Contributor

    Miss my Gran at Christmas even though she just whinged about the whole day - bairns being too noisy, we'd gone over the top with food, we shouldn't be drinking wine, there was a draught coming from the dining room doors and so on. Then she'd tell other relatives she'd had a great day at mine and really enjoyed it :lol:

    She used to steal all the cracker presents too and when she died, we found masses of plastic moustaches, crappy bead bracelets, jumping frogs etc., stashed all over her house.
     
  6. Mantobar

    Mantobar Central Defender

    Songs for me
    Last farewell Roger Whitaker
    Welling up writing this
     
    Son of Stan likes this.
  7. foolzy

    foolzy Winger

    Lost me Dad in April, can't go in Morrison's AT Seaburn as he'd go there every day for his dinner.

    Ten days before he died we were in there, he was obviously seriously ill with his cancer and he was just shuffling around the store, still refusing any help carrying his bags. If I went in now, don't think I'd get past the doors without bubbling.

    We were told on the 19th April he had weeks/months left. Cancer was then 75% of his liver, in his lungs and his oesophagus. He died on the 27th April. Never left his side from the 23rd.

    Still feels like it happened to someone else, think I was just in a bubble at the time.
     
    Son of Stan likes this.
  8. Jimmer13

    Jimmer13 Goalkeeper

    Phew - As long as we keep our loved ones and friends alive in our memories and occasionally speak to family and friends, then they are still here and alive to us and to others who remember them......
     
  9. janey

    janey Striker Contributor

    :cry::cry:
     
  10. Keawyeds

    Keawyeds Striker

    FAO Mods.

    Did I get a warning for that above S&M comment?!

    I meant no disrespect, I just couldn't resist the classic M&S joke.
     
  11. Coeus

    Coeus Striker

    Im sorry mate, welled a bit at that.
     
  12. foolzy

    foolzy Winger

    It's crackers, I just bombed through it all at the time. Seems to be affecting me more now after everything has settled down. It's not like he was a young'un he was 79.

    He had always been there for me though, I was 15 when my Mam died and then 16 when I broke my back. He dragged me through all that, thought he was harsh at the time but i was never allowed to wallow and feel sorry for myself and he made me what i am today.
     
  13. i used to always take my mam shopping in peterlee asda. a while back when i was in there i walked past the cake aisle and spotted the mr kipling lemon slices that she loved and would always stock up on. it just hit me like a stone and had to dash into the toilets bubbling like a bairn.

    earlier on in the year i don't know why but i had convinced myself something was wrong and i was dying. this went on for a few weeks and i'd bottled it up and not told anybody. sackless i know. one night i had a dream i was in the kitchen of the house i grew up in at wheatley hill. my mam was doing the washing up and i was tugging at her pinny shouting and screaming that i didn't want to die. she turned round and said don't be daft son it's not your time yet.
    since that happened i've had a strange sense of contentment and peace.

    apologies for being morbid.
     
  14. Sam Handwich

    Sam Handwich Midfield

    I could write a book about the day my Dad died. Remember every little detail.
     

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