Coronavirus

cosmicchris00

Midfield
A World Health Organisation report of 2007 identified wet markets of certain Chinese provinces as likely points of future Coronavirus outbreaks.

Special emphasis was given to markets dealing in bats for human consumption as the species is known to harbour high concentrations of the virus

They were spot on really
 

Lord Potts

Winger
With a population that makes up a quarter of the human race statistically China has a greater chance than any other nation state of being the source of any new virus. Other parts of the world do however make their own contribution like Africa with Ebola and probably Aids.

The origin of Syphilis for example is thought to have been in Europe around C14th and it was certainly us Brits who took it to Polynesia in the C18th were it had been previously unknown. This was one of Captain Cook's lesser known achievements who is now believed to have been a likely sufferer himself.
 
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BRMC

Striker
This is a canny video explaining how China went for famine to feeding it's huge pollution, to which the lead to these diseases


 

r@mside

Striker
It is entirely different to wild hunting in the UK.

Read the 2007 report on Coronavirus in bats
Viruses in poultry and pigs can jump to humans easier than from bats and were the source of the biggest and most lethal pandemic in history.

Globally these viruses kill over half a million each year and thousands here in the UK, despite the benefit of vaccines that provide immunity.

Yet, we're still allowed to keep poultry and pigs unsupervised in our gardens or even in the house if we like, and lots of people do.
 
A World Health Organisation report of 2007 identified wet markets of certain Chinese provinces as likely points of future Coronavirus outbreaks.

Special emphasis was given to markets dealing in bats for human consumption as the species is known to harbour high concentrations of the virus

They were spot on really
Was it WHO or is it this you're referring to?


American Society for Microbiology had published this research paper titled 'Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus as an Agent of Emerging and Re-emerging Infection' report in October 2007. The paper was authored by Vincent C.C. Cheng, Susanna K.P. Lau, Patrick C.Y. Woo, and Kwok Yung Yuen of the Department of Microbiology, Research Centre of Infection and Immunology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.



"The presence of a large reservoir of SARS-CoV-like viruses in horseshoe bats, together with the culture of eating exotic mammals in southern China, is a time bomb. The possibility of the re-emergence of SARS and other novel viruses from animals or laboratories and therefore the need for preparedness should not be ignored," stated a University of Hong Kong research paper.
 
Viruses in poultry and pigs can jump to humans easier than from bats and were the source of the biggest and most lethal pandemic in history.

Globally these viruses kill over half a million each year and thousands here in the UK, despite the benefit of vaccines that provide immunity.

Yet, we're still allowed to keep poultry and pigs unsupervised in our gardens or even in the house if we like, and lots of people do.
What was the most lethal pandemic in history?
 

cosmicchris00

Midfield
Was it WHO or is it this you're referring to?


American Society for Microbiology had published this research paper titled 'Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus as an Agent of Emerging and Re-emerging Infection' report in October 2007. The paper was authored by Vincent C.C. Cheng, Susanna K.P. Lau, Patrick C.Y. Woo, and Kwok Yung Yuen of the Department of Microbiology, Research Centre of Infection and Immunology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.



"The presence of a large reservoir of SARS-CoV-like viruses in horseshoe bats, together with the culture of eating exotic mammals in southern China, is a time bomb. The possibility of the re-emergence of SARS and other novel viruses from animals or laboratories and therefore the need for preparedness should not be ignored," stated a University of Hong Kong research paper.
I think we're both right.

The first I saw of the report was an article my pal showed me on Fyasbyeuk, which quoted WHO.

He then sent me the ASM link.

I'd not seen the Uni of Hong Kong link before.
What was the most lethal pandemic in history?
That would be the Spanish Flu outbreak of 1919
 
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