1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

We are Making fragile Bowlers - interesting article

Discussion in 'Cricket' started by Bri, Nov 13, 2017 at 1:02 PM.

  1. Bri

    Bri Winger

  2. badger55

    badger55 Full Back

    I was at a "talk in" several years ago with Norman Graham. For the people that do not know him he is the Northumberland cricketer who opened the bowling for Kent for about 18 years.
    Someone asked him about the demands on fast bowlers and the amount of injuries they pick up, in modern day cricket.
    He quoted a newspaper article about Steve Harmison, in his prime, bowling 450 overs in a season, and stating, what a hard workload it was.
    Norman laughed and said "I used to bowl 1,000 overs a season" !
    He then talked about "injuries".
    He said the contracts he had meant if he did not play then he did not get paid ! So if he had an "injury" he kept his mouth shut and strapped on his bowling boots and got out onto the field.
    These were the days of 3 day County cricket and 120 overs per day. They played every County twice in the season.
    Norman said he got fit by bowling !
     
  3. Bri

    Bri Winger

    Aye, I've heard Bob Willis talk about getting fit by bowling I in fact I think he says the only way to get bowling fit is to bowl.
     
  4. These old timers hark on about how many overs they got through but I wonder what their pace would have been clocked at at the end of the season or the end of a Test series.

    The game has changed. Pitches are better, batsman protective equipment is better, bats are better, batsmen are more aggressive. If fast bowlers were to get through the amount of overs that they used back in the day they’d be chucking down buffet stuff. Bowlers aren’t being made fragile, they’re being looked after better than they ever have in order to prolong their careers and make them as competitive as possible for as long as possible
     
    chunkylover53 likes this.
  5. vinegar hill

    vinegar hill Striker

    Well how come these protected bowlers who bowl less are always breaking down?
     
  6. Parkside

    Parkside Central Defender

    The game has changed and uncovered wickets is the biggest change. That doesn't alter the fact that bowlers did regularly bowl 1000 overs a season with no noticeable diminishing of speed either towards end of the season or the end of a game. They kept fit by bowling and played with strains by strapping them up. Present fitness schedules require serious re-examining. The sedentary lifestyles of today's youngsters is also a big factor.
     
  7. Absolutely this.

    Sports science has developed so far. It’s the equivalent of people saying that players from the 70s could have turned up pissed and lived with messi and ronaldo
     
  8. Parkside

    Parkside Central Defender

    Likes of Trueman and Statham certainly turned up hung over and played without dimineshment in performance likewise batsmen such as Compton and Edrich.We've probably all witnessed 1st hand Ned Larkins do likewise. That, however, is not the issue under discussion.
    Stefan Jones has researched the matter and states as fact that injuries amongst fast bowlers are much more prevalent than yesteryear even though they then had a heavier work load. That suggests that the sports scientists aren't getting it right. Kyle Abbott in the article following Dobell's emphasised that the way to prepare for bowling is to bowl and that he knows his body best and when to rest.
     
  9. Playing hungover against poorer standards is fine. Obviously
     
  10. badger55

    badger55 Full Back

    One of the biggest differences was what the bowlers did in the winter.
    Some of them played other sports, football, hockey,rugby etc;
    Very few of them went overseas to play cricket, unless they were England players.
    The majority of County cricketers had to work, as their contracts did not pay them in the winter.
    This all meant they kept fit but used other muscles in the off season.
    I would guess very few of them would be using the gym and lifting heavy weights.
     
  11. Parkside

    Parkside Central Defender

    It's never fine and would impair performance but some are good enough to get away with it even against good opposition.I'm not so sure that this obsession with diet and fitness has brought higher standards apart from fielding obviously. It even appears to be detrimental with fast bowling.
     
  12. badger55

    badger55 Full Back

    There was an interesting interview with Peter Willey about 3 years ago. He was asked if he thought David would play Test Cricket.
    His reply was "NO", the reason given was "he doesn't bowl fast enough".
    He then went on to say "God gave him a pace to bowl at and he has to improve his skills at that pace".
    Many young bowlers hit the gym to try and reach 85-90 mph and that could be where the injuries occur ?
     
  13. Ageing trundler

    Ageing trundler Full Back

    I'd say more bowling and less gym work. For all the advances in technology, you learn a lot by practising bowling. There is an element of vanity in constantly being in the gym.
     
    TheRey likes this.
  14. 3.142

    3.142 Midfield

    I think there's an element of truth to over using the gym, but I do think it has helped others on the conditioning side of things. Stuart Broad comes to mind who wasn't physically strong enough to bowl the pace and long spells needed without breaking down so took dedicated time focusing on that and his fitness record has since improved. Then again, he's a fairly smart cookie with good guidance and others definitely fall into the trap of gym for the sake of the gym without any real purpose.

    And I definitely agree with the limits put on young bowlers being too small in terms of number of overs. They then end up playing more games to get the bowling in and trying to bowl even faster because they are fresh rather than settling into longer spells. Then they reach an age they bowl much longer spells multiple times a day and their body can't withstand it.
     
  15. Ageing trundler

    Ageing trundler Full Back

    Craft ahead of pace, especially over here. There is too much emphasis on bowling at 90mph. You don't need to do that to be successful and those who coach and select at the top level should say so. Take Rushy for example, he should have played for England but was overlooked because he's only brilliant at 80 mph. Years ago, Cork, Fraser, McGrath etc were successful, nibbling it about. Nothing has changed as Philander has shown in recent times.
     

Share This Page