tish murtha - bbc4

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9PM on bbc 4 - tish…




Well worth a watch, as a lot of posters here lived the life she photographed. Documentary is by her daughter, and really brings her life to the big screen really well. Saw it on the big screen at the tyneside cinema but I’m sure it’ll work just as well on the small screen.

It’s an image of the north east that really isn’t that far from where we are today. I’m sure a lot of people will be familiar with her work, like Eslwick Kids or the Jazz Bands…


 


I'd never heard of her, had no idea BBC4 were having a photography night, but fortunately stumbled on it.

Odd how the photos seem from a different world... but aren't, I'm older than some of the kids she was photographing. Being from Marley Pots I'm obviously from a far more civilised background than the newcastle one she was recording but lots of things striking a chord.

And weird but refreshing hearing a proper north east accent doing the voice over. Been a good night's viewing.
 
Tate Britain now display most of her major series of works within its permanent collections. I think they include some pictures from Jarrow (my town) from the Juvenile Jazz Bands series. Would definitely go and have a look at the exhibition if and when in London next. The Elswick photos are incredible and capture a distillation of what life was like on the peripheries around here in the 70's and early 80's.
 
My daughter did a short film a few years ago with a couple of others through the Tyneside Cinema on Tish Murtha. They found three of the kids from her photos, interviewed them and filmed them from the places they were photographed in the `80`s to see how they fared 40 years or so later.

They had a premiere in the Tyneside Cinema and some of those "kids" were invited to the screening and it was really moving both sad and funny. Real mixed emotions came from it. I`m not just saying it because I`m her Dad, but it was really well done and very powerful and a damning indictment of Thatcher`s Britain up North.

It actually won 2 National awards and was in for a third at a screening in the House Of Lords but were beaten into second place by a professional production company.

Maybe the film was just too political for the Lord`s to vote the winner but they didn`t do too bad for someone without any media experience who just wanted to do something fun over the summer holidays.
My daughter did a short film a few years ago with a couple of others through the Tyneside Cinema on Tish Murtha. They found three of the kids from her photos, interviewed them and filmed them from the places they were photographed in the `80`s to see how they fared 40 years or so later.

They had a premiere in the Tyneside Cinema and some of those "kids" were invited to the screening and it was really moving both sad and funny. Real mixed emotions came from it. I`m not just saying it because I`m her Dad, but it was really well done and very powerful and a damning indictment of Thatcher`s Britain up North.

It actually won 2 National awards and was in for a third at a screening in the House Of Lords but were beaten into second place by a professional production company.

Maybe the film was just too political for the Lord`s to vote the winner but they didn`t do too bad for someone without any media experience who just wanted to do something fun over the summer holidays.
If the link to her documentary is still live I`ll post it.
 
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I’ve known one of her (other) brothers for years through work, and it really captured the fiery, passionate character he used to describe. Even aside from making her photography better known, I thought it was a really good documentary that anyone with half an interest in the northeast’s history should watch. Angry in all the right places too: the 70s and 80s West End feels like another world, until it comes up to benefits sanctions as she was dying. Credit to her daughter for all the work she’s done to keep her mam’s legacy alive.
 
Even aside from making her photography better known, I thought it was a really good documentary that anyone with half an interest in the northeast’s history should watch. Angry in all the right places too: the 70s and 80s West End feels like another world, until it comes up to benefits sanctions as she was dying.
to me, both her work & this film brings to life what she was seeing with her own eyes... different to just someone being in the room with the camera, she was living that life. think someone says that she was accpeted by the subjects matters that her camera wasnt really there to some extent. the photos around the union actions against vickers closing the scotswood works feels like you're in the room as if its still the 70s.
If the link to her documentary is still live I`ll post it.
would love to see that... sounds like a fantastic piece of work from your daughter.
 
to me, both her work & this film brings to life what she was seeing with her own eyes... different to just someone being in the room with the camera, she was living that life. think someone says that she was accpeted by the subjects matters that her camera wasnt really there to some extent. the photos around the union actions against vickers closing the scotswood works feels like you're in the room as if its still the 70s.

would love to see that... sounds like a fantastic piece of work from your daughter.

That was the real lost world element for me: looked like being out with my grandad’s friends from work. And there was something about those few shots of her among them all too: just a slip of a young lass, but just obviously part of the scene she was in. Then to cap it off, that rejection from the Arts Council for her project in Middlesbrough after she wrote all about immersing herself in the community :(
 
to me, both her work & this film brings to life what she was seeing with her own eyes... different to just someone being in the room with the camera, she was living that life. think someone says that she was accpeted by the subjects matters that her camera wasnt really there to some extent. the photos around the union actions against vickers closing the scotswood works feels like you're in the room as if its still the 70s.

would love to see that... sounds like a fantastic piece of work from your daughter.
I found it - it`s still up.

It`s only 7 minutes or so long so a nice length to watch to get a good summary of Tish Murtha and what happened to those kids in the photos:

She was part of the team and even though the credits show different people did different roles they all co-wrote it, devised the questions, decided where to film and worked on the directing and editing together and they had help back at the Tyneside Cinema with post production work.

What she did say, is the stuff they cut out was quite political and damning of the Tory government but it was felt that they should focus more on the people. I wish they`d been able to make, certainly what my daughter, wanted to make but the project was designed to be a short documentary under 10 minutes or so.
 
Fascinating documentary and a lot of it still relevant today. In creative circles there's a very middle class view of what working class 'art' should be. In the wrong hands it would have been poverty porn but as it was her life, there was a joy to it.
 
I found it - it`s still up.

It`s only 7 minutes or so long so a nice length to watch to get a good summary of Tish Murtha and what happened to those kids in the photos:

She was part of the team and even though the credits show different people did different roles they all co-wrote it, devised the questions, decided where to film and worked on the directing and editing together and they had help back at the Tyneside Cinema with post production work.

What she did say, is the stuff they cut out was quite political and damning of the Tory government but it was felt that they should focus more on the people. I wish they`d been able to make, certainly what my daughter, wanted to make but the project was designed to be a short documentary under 10 minutes or so.
Enjoyed that. They did a great job.
 
Tate Britain now display most of her major series of works within its permanent collections. I think they include some pictures from Jarrow (my town) from the Juvenile Jazz Bands series. Would definitely go and have a look at the exhibition if and when in London next. The Elswick photos are incredible and capture a distillation of what life was like on the peripheries around here in the 70's and early 80's.
Hill Park Kilties
 

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