The time has come for football to start asking some difficult questions about remembrance

ooh its a corner

Subs Bench
Remembrance Sunday is exactly that, Remembrance Sunday and I fully support all the ceremony and poppy wearing 100%. But organisations such as sky sports news have every body in a poppy at least a fortnight beforehand and I'd imagine any guests who said no to wearing one wouldn't get back on the show which is very wrong.
 
I’d imagine that a lot of people agree with me that the annual remembrance ceremony observed by millions for over a hundred years doesn’t need reinvention, crass gimmicks or alteration in the slightest.
I would not argue one bit with that statement, but what I would say is the world has changed and everything is trying to be bigger and louder than the next to raise awareness and the money they raise to help the armed forces vets, so I have no problem with them doing what they are. I am one who thinks you remember how you want to do it, not going to a ceremony our not wearing a poppy does not me you still don't take the time to remember our fallen friends and colleague's.
 

Stubbs ftm

Winger
You could not be more wrong.
It is in my opinion.
The journalist asks why football remembers the fallen. Why wouldn't it? Thousands of football supporters will have served and no doubt died in ww1 and ww2. Football was played in no man's land, football and sport in general brings people together. Why shouldn't thousands who gather every other week pay their respects to our armed forces?

I agree the poppy mascot was a bit too much.
 

LUBITSCH

Midfield
Just what I'd expect from that disgusting rag. Thankfully we live in a country where people like Squires are free to sneer. Of course some of the behaviour surrounding Armistice Day is over the top and tasteless now, that's the world of 2019, but if it brings more money to help ex-servicemen and their dependants while reminding people what we owe to ordinary men and women then so be it.
 

brianbaker

Subs Bench
Never ever forget, being able to go to watch a football match with your family on a Saturday afternoon would probably not have been option had those heroes not made the ultimate sacrifice!
dont be naive. the Germans would have had a better league to watch! remembering soft simple shites being sacrificed by the elite is not remembrance it is the passing on of guilt from the top and you have fallen into their trap - AGAIN!
 

Geronimo

Striker
dont be naive. the Germans would have had a better league to watch! remembering soft simple shites being sacrificed by the elite is not remembrance it is the passing on of guilt from the top and you have fallen into their trap - AGAIN!
Ouch.
A bit harsh
 

sam vimes

Central Defender
I'm an ex-serviceman (full pensionable term). I don't recall not being involved in remembrance in some small way in every one of those years of service, regardless of the location or situation. I'm actually quite bemused by the extended carnival that remembrance has become. Through most of my career, it was a parade and church service on the closest Sunday, with a minute of silence at 1100hrs on the 11th of November. That was it, it was perfectly respectful, contemplative, dignified and quite enough. There were two types of poppy. Both were the same paper and plastic, but one had a green leaf. Now we've got a poppy arms race (Swarovski crystal poppy anyone?) and minutes silences all over the place (in football). Every club has the special poppy shirts, which I don't remember happening at all that far back. It almost certainly didn't happen prior to 2000.

I don't disagree with the Independent article. Remembrance in football has gone way over the top, to the point of being distasteful. Anything that happens should be restricted to the weekend of Remembrance Sunday. If a club doesn't happen to be at home that weekend, so be it. If football fans actually care enough about remembrance, they'll be able to find a Sunday morning service/parade in just about every town and city in the land. As it stands, remembrance has become caught up in the whole empathy race that seems to have started with Diana's death. There's a whole culture of "I care more than you" where people have to ostentatiously try to show just how caring they are, often without actually doing a thing. The fact that it's largely hollow, and purely for show, seems to be lost on many.

I'm all for remembrance and servicemen young and old. I'm not for this increasingly distasteful carnival. The British stiff upper lip is rightly being consigned to history. However, I hope that it isn't going to take all sense of decorum with it. I wouldn't even pretend to speak for all of them, but I suspect a decent number of servicemen, current and former, will feel similarly.
 
Some interesting points raised in that article. Especially the part about the army recruitment van outside of Stoke's ground. Didn't realised that happened and it certainly doesn't sit right with me.
Some interesting points raised in that article. Especially the part about the army recruitment van outside of Stoke's ground. Didn't realised that happened and it certainly doesn't sit right with me.
 
Don't believe that's the case. It's taught in most schools in most of Europe, USA, Australia, India etc etc
Holocaust Memorial Day: 'Shocking' levels of denial remain One in 20 denies Holocaust took place
just a small selection mate. No one is more surprised than me.
 
I'm an ex-serviceman (full pensionable term). I don't recall not being involved in remembrance in some small way in every one of those years of service, regardless of the location or situation. I'm actually quite bemused by the extended carnival that remembrance has become. Through most of my career, it was a parade and church service on the closest Sunday, with a minute of silence at 1100hrs on the 11th of November. That was it, it was perfectly respectful, contemplative, dignified and quite enough. There were two types of poppy. Both were the same paper and plastic, but one had a green leaf. Now we've got a poppy arms race (Swarovski crystal poppy anyone?) and minutes silences all over the place (in football). Every club has the special poppy shirts, which I don't remember happening at all that far back. It almost certainly didn't happen prior to 2000.

I don't disagree with the Independent article. Remembrance in football has gone way over the top, to the point of being distasteful. Anything that happens should be restricted to the weekend of Remembrance Sunday. If a club doesn't happen to be at home that weekend, so be it. If football fans actually care enough about remembrance, they'll be able to find a Sunday morning service/parade in just about every town and city in the land. As it stands, remembrance has become caught up in the whole empathy race that seems to have started with Diana's death. There's a whole culture of "I care more than you" where people have to ostentatiously try to show just how caring they are, often without actually doing a thing. The fact that it's largely hollow, and purely for show, seems to be lost on many.

I'm all for remembrance and servicemen young and old. I'm not for this increasingly distasteful carnival. The British stiff upper lip is rightly being consigned to history. However, I hope that it isn't going to take all sense of decorum with it. I wouldn't even pretend to speak for all of them, but I suspect a decent number of servicemen, current and former, will feel similarly.
Post of the thread. Absolutely nailed it.
 
I'm an ex-serviceman (full pensionable term). I don't recall not being involved in remembrance in some small way in every one of those years of service, regardless of the location or situation. I'm actually quite bemused by the extended carnival that remembrance has become. Through most of my career, it was a parade and church service on the closest Sunday, with a minute of silence at 1100hrs on the 11th of November. That was it, it was perfectly respectful, contemplative, dignified and quite enough. There were two types of poppy. Both were the same paper and plastic, but one had a green leaf. Now we've got a poppy arms race (Swarovski crystal poppy anyone?) and minutes silences all over the place (in football). Every club has the special poppy shirts, which I don't remember happening at all that far back. It almost certainly didn't happen prior to 2000.

I don't disagree with the Independent article. Remembrance in football has gone way over the top, to the point of being distasteful. Anything that happens should be restricted to the weekend of Remembrance Sunday. If a club doesn't happen to be at home that weekend, so be it. If football fans actually care enough about remembrance, they'll be able to find a Sunday morning service/parade in just about every town and city in the land. As it stands, remembrance has become caught up in the whole empathy race that seems to have started with Diana's death. There's a whole culture of "I care more than you" where people have to ostentatiously try to show just how caring they are, often without actually doing a thing. The fact that it's largely hollow, and purely for show, seems to be lost on many.

I'm all for remembrance and servicemen young and old. I'm not for this increasingly distasteful carnival. The British stiff upper lip is rightly being consigned to history. However, I hope that it isn't going to take all sense of decorum with it. I wouldn't even pretend to speak for all of them, but I suspect a decent number of servicemen, current and former, will feel similarly.
Cracking post that mate. Hit the nail on the head.
 

LBW

Full Back
dont be naive. the Germans would have had a better league to watch! remembering soft simple shites being sacrificed by the elite is not remembrance it is the passing on of guilt from the top and you have fallen into their trap - AGAIN!
Wankers like you are a stain on society.
 

LineTrash

Striker
Remembering falling soldiers giving their lives for generations that follow and people want it out, no big deal...but god forbid if anyone said anything about a rainbow flag or pin. A girl was kicked off US national team for it...it’s almost like there’s an agenda.
 

Struts

Midfield
I'm an ex-serviceman (full pensionable term). I don't recall not being involved in remembrance in some small way in every one of those years of service, regardless of the location or situation. I'm actually quite bemused by the extended carnival that remembrance has become. Through most of my career, it was a parade and church service on the closest Sunday, with a minute of silence at 1100hrs on the 11th of November. That was it, it was perfectly respectful, contemplative, dignified and quite enough. There were two types of poppy. Both were the same paper and plastic, but one had a green leaf. Now we've got a poppy arms race (Swarovski crystal poppy anyone?) and minutes silences all over the place (in football). Every club has the special poppy shirts, which I don't remember happening at all that far back. It almost certainly didn't happen prior to 2000.

I don't disagree with the Independent article. Remembrance in football has gone way over the top, to the point of being distasteful. Anything that happens should be restricted to the weekend of Remembrance Sunday. If a club doesn't happen to be at home that weekend, so be it. If football fans actually care enough about remembrance, they'll be able to find a Sunday morning service/parade in just about every town and city in the land. As it stands, remembrance has become caught up in the whole empathy race that seems to have started with Diana's death. There's a whole culture of "I care more than you" where people have to ostentatiously try to show just how caring they are, often without actually doing a thing. The fact that it's largely hollow, and purely for show, seems to be lost on many.

I'm all for remembrance and servicemen young and old. I'm not for this increasingly distasteful carnival. The British stiff upper lip is rightly being consigned to history. However, I hope that it isn't going to take all sense of decorum with it. I wouldn't even pretend to speak for all of them, but I suspect a decent number of servicemen, current and former, will feel similarly.
Fantastic post

dont be naive. the Germans would have had a better league to watch! remembering soft simple shites being sacrificed by the elite is not remembrance it is the passing on of guilt from the top and you have fallen into their trap - AGAIN!
Awful post
 
dont be naive. the Germans would have had a better league to watch! remembering soft simple shites being sacrificed by the elite is not remembrance it is the passing on of guilt from the top and you have fallen into their trap - AGAIN!
Are you saying that those killed in conflict are soft simple shites? Is that what you are saying? I just want to make sure I’m understanding this properly.
 

girojim

Striker
Remembering falling soldiers giving their lives for generations that follow and people want it out, no big deal...but god forbid if anyone said anything about a rainbow flag or pin. A girl was kicked off US national team for it...it’s almost like there’s an agenda.
no one wants remembering out
 

Jelly Belly

Midfield
It is in my opinion.
The journalist asks why football remembers the fallen. Why wouldn't it? Thousands of football supporters will have served and no doubt died in ww1 and ww2. Football was played in no man's land, football and sport in general brings people together. Why shouldn't thousands who gather every other week pay their respects to our armed forces?

I agree the poppy mascot was a bit too much.
He isn't saying that Football shouldn't pay its respects, he's basically suggesting that the commercialism of the poppy and the way it's meaning as been seemingly lost on a lot of people and companies needs to be addressed. FFS even the buses around our way have a fucking poppy stuck on them. I grew up in the Forces, my old man served in the RAF for 30 years, it was a big deal with the remembrance Sunday Parade and a two minute silence on the 11th but that's it, quiet dignity is all that is needed
 

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