The Somme remembrance 1st July

Status
Not open for further replies.

---Nemo---

Striker
"One night I was in the line - I was helping the medical officer in his job and doing my own at the same time - when two men came in. The first was one of our men, the other was a German, and they were both wounded. Our man said to the doctor, Here's a job I made for you doctor, and he made this one for me". What could you do with men like that? They were grand".

Reverend John Duffield. Chaplain Lancashire Battalion, Bantam Brigade. From "Forgotten Voices".

Grand indeed. Although we can't hold a candle to them we can light one in their memory.
 

Pancho

Striker
Staff member
Whoever came up with the idea of the
Ghost soliders is a genius

Very moving
I skim read an article a few days ago that mentioned the Somme and performance art and dismissed it as a bit of a gimmick.

I couldn't have been more wrong.

The concept is genius.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gaz
I don't cry very often, can't remember the last time I did, but watching some the segments on the news this morning it just hit me and the tears came. This has been a brilliant thread with some amazing posts which have been brilliant to read and it's important that, although they are heartbreaking, we keep posting these amazing memories so that we never ever forget.
 

Son of Stan

Striker
I don't cry very often, can't remember the last time I did, but watching some the segments on the news this morning it just hit me and the tears came. This has been a brilliant thread with some amazing posts which have been brilliant to read and it's important that, although they are heartbreaking, we keep posting these amazing memories so that we never ever forget.
This was me this morning after the 2 minute silence. Just started me thinking of my Dad and his Dad being unable to communicate anything about WW1 to him before Dad went off to WW2. And he died while he was away. Just so sad. And Dad was the same - he hated seeing the men who used to take part in parades with their medals and spoke very little about what he actually went through. Everyone deals with it differently and in their own way. And men of Dad/Grandad's generation rarely showed their feelings.
 

Dave Herbal

Striker
I have trouble identifying with them, being a professional coward. Volunteer for operation almost certain death? Aye, sign us up.
At least since then you have a fighting chance. Thank fuck.
 

dcl0sc

Striker
Dunno about the Somme, but family received a telegram reporting that my Great Great uncle was KIA and MIA. About 6 months later, after months of mourning him, they received word that he had been found in a military hospital in Scotland. He was recovering from the effects of Mustard gas!
 

Dixie50

Central Defender
My Grandad and his brother both joined the Northumberland Fusiliers together and we're both in the 25th Battalion Tyneside Irish. Great Uncle Sam was listed as Missing on 1st July and was never found. Grandad frantically looked for him for days afterwards visiting all the ais stations and hospital in the hope of finding him but never did.

He is commerated on the Thiepval Memorial as well as a plaque in the porch of St Bede's church in S. Shields. We as a family laid a wreath to his memory in the church.

I cried today as I looked at my brother and tried to imagine how I would feel if he was to suddenly disappear without trace and I was never see him again. All these boys volunteered together, brothers, cousins and friends, this scenario must have been a common ocurrence.

Grandad survived after being wounded in the knee later on in the battle.
 

RokerLegend

Striker
Ive got nowt to add really to this class thread expect this military tune I heard back in the 90's at one of the remembrance parades.

 

Lord Potts

Winger
I have always thought that in any other country in the world Haig would have been court-martialed and shot for what he was responsible for. I have never been convinced by the revisionist historians who make excuses for him. How can near enough 20,000 dead in a day be ever excused? God only knows how many of them went in the first couple of hours. The vicar on the telly the other day said we should think of those lads suffering - many of the poor beggars didn't have time to "suffer" they were dead within minutes.
 
"One night I was in the line - I was helping the medical officer in his job and doing my own at the same time - when two men came in. The first was one of our men, the other was a German, and they were both wounded. Our man said to the doctor, Here's a job I made for you doctor, and he made this one for me". What could you do with men like that? They were grand".

Reverend John Duffield. Chaplain Lancashire Battalion, Bantam Brigade. From "Forgotten Voices".

Grand indeed. Although we can't hold a candle to them we can light one in their memory.
I read a superb book a few years ago about WW1 which was a collection of events and soldiers letters home. I've been meaning to read it again but couldn't remember the title. Is it Forgotten Voices?
 

UZZA_SPARTA

Midfield
I read a superb book a few years ago about WW1 which was a collection of events and soldiers letters home. I've been meaning to read it again but couldn't remember the title. Is it Forgotten Voices?
I think you mean a book called Love, Tommy by Andrew Roberts (published 2012)? - although it not just the 1st World War? - its a collection of letters written from WW1 all way through to modern warfare (2008) and was published in association with Imperial War Museums
I have a copy with orange/black cover
 

Paddy O'Dors

Striker
I have trouble identifying with them, being a professional coward. Volunteer for operation almost certain death? Aye, sign us up.
At least since then you have a fighting chance. Thank fuck.
I think the chances of being a serving soldier and being killed in WWI was less than 10%. You had more chance of being wounded and even greater chance of coming home unscathed, apart from a lot of mental anguish and torture (which wasn't recognised back then).
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Top