Spanish ex-pats

a person who has come to live permanently in a country that is not their own
immigrant communities/families/workers


That'll be an immigrant then, not an "expat". as we've already covered

You can call them immigrants and I'll call them ex pats. What a great language we have.

Edit, it depends upon your definition of permanent. Most of the ex pats would still see Blighty as home and if anything got a bit dodgy would be off like a shot.
 
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a person who has come to live permanently in a country that is not their own
immigrant communities/families/workers


That'll be an immigrant then, not an "expat". as we've already covered


Except chances are a Spaniard living in the UK would probably be called an immigrant, not an "expat"


Cheeky blighter :lol:
Sorry . Actually Bolton is one of my favourite towns (the biggest in England anarl) with a very impressive town centre .
 

kossoff

Striker
I had employees in Spain so have a decent idea from an employment law perspective but surely it’s nothing a bit of planning couldn’t solve.

It certainly gives an insight into how some have got themselves in trouble though.
I think all on this thread are legal however Brexit is forcing a change - one that is not mandatory at the moment however will surely creep in (TIE). Seems as though people are aware and at least considering getting sorted in advance.
 
You can call them what you like as you sit on your veranda in your pith helmet while the punka-wallah fans you
The good old days.

Started reading T E Lawrence Seven Pillars. Fascinating view of the Arabian :lol:

How different we are as a people. from the average Arab in 1915 and from the average Army officer. (I know lawrence was far from average)

Totally mad.
 
The good old days.

Started reading T E Lawrence Seven Pillars. Fascinating view of the Arabian :lol:

How different we are as a people. from the average Arab in 1915 and from the average Army officer. (I know lawrence was far from average)

Totally mad.

I like 7 pillars. One of Britains last true Conservatives (rather than a reactionary nationalist or a plutocrat)

His view of the "noble Arab" with a special place in the Empires racial hierachy lives on today in Corbyn and his chums chanting "From the River to the Sea"
 
I’ve always thought you called someone an ex-pat if you’re from the point of view of the person’s native land, like I’d call a Brit living in Spain an ex-Pat and a Spaniard would call another Spaniard living in the UK an ex-pat or whatever the Spanish equivalent to that is.
TBH, that's how I thought it worked. Not that I really care.
Possibly emigrant is the term we're all searching for here.
 
I like 7 pillars. One of Britains last true Conservatives (rather than a reactionary nationalist or a plutocrat)

His view of the "noble Arab" with a special place in the Empires racial hierachy lives on today in Corbyn and his chums chanting "From the River to the Sea"
It has never interested me but I was reading something else and I bought it a while back. Not far in but the thought processes and the descriptions are fascinating.

The gay bit at the start was quite a revelation. Very matter of fact. :lol:
 

Keawyeds

Striker
Sorry . Actually Bolton is one of my favourite towns (the biggest in England anarl) with a very impressive town centre .

Lovely buildings, but alas too many empty shops these days.
Incidentally, Le Mans Crescent in Bolton was recently used for "It's A Sin" and the other day Peaky Blinders were back filming again :)
You can call them immigrants and I'll call them ex pats. What a great language we have.

Edit, it depends upon your definition of permanent. Most of the ex pats would still see Blighty as home and if anything got a bit dodgy would be off like a shot.

You're missing my point though Harry. The term is not afforded to people who come over to the UK to make a living and settle.
If they were to choose to go back to their country of origin, would they still be called ex-pats? I doubt it.
It's a double standards thing more than anything else.
 
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Monty Pigeon

Striker
Spoke yesterday to two friends who stayed on in Spain after we left. She's been granted residency, but he hasn't - he was involved in a fatal car crash a few years ago, and although it wasn't his fault, it has left him with a police record. (The moral of that story, if you drive in Spain and an old woman pulls out in front of you from a side road and is killed in the resulting accident, ultimately you'll be held responsible no matter what.) He has permission to remain while his appeal is heard, but if they have to leave the country for any reason during that time he won't be allowed back in and the appeal will be rendered null and void. They've had enough. They're going to leave.

They're not the only ones. Apparently the mood within the expat community has changed markedly in the past month. Many of the hardliners who were never going to leave are now packing up. The former 'it'll all be fine' attitude has gone completely. Many of them are firmly blaming the EU, as if this is something nobody saw coming.
 
You can call them immigrants and I'll call them ex pats. What a great language we have.

Edit, it depends upon your definition of permanent. Most of the ex pats would still see Blighty as home and if anything got a bit dodgy would be off like a shot.

Never a truer word on here :lol:

Cancer? Straight back to the UK for NHS treatment despite having been abroad for years.

War? 'Hi, is that the consulate? I need to be on a relief flight home immediately'.
 
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You're missing my point though Harry. The term is not afforded to people who come over to the UK to make a living and settle.
If they were to choose to go back to their country of origin, would they still be called ex-pats? I doubt it.
It's a double standards thing more than anything else.
I knew exactly the point you were making. Plenty of French ex pats living in London.;)
 

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