Spanish ex-pats

I had employees in Spain so have a decent idea from an employment law perspective but surely it’s nothing a bit of planning couldn’t solve.

It certainly gives an insight into how some have got themselves in trouble though.
A little taster. After six months of trying I was eventually able to make an appointment to get the new fancy residents card. The police open the internet window for around 5 mins a day. There's no way of knowing what time they'll open it, so you basically have to spend all day trying. Luckily I'm on holiday and so I had the time.

I managed to get the appointment last Thursday the 1st of April, it's for tomorrow the 9th of April. When you have appointments like this there are often taxes to pay. Some of them like this one you cannot pay online. The only way is in a bank. Many of the banks here are not even seeing customers. I tried to get an appointment with my bank but there was nothing until next week.
After a day of constant failures yesterday, I eventually got into a bank this morning , the cashier said we shouldn't really allow you to pay because the new (Covid) dates for paying are on Tuesdays and Thursdays and only between the 10th and the 20th of each month. There is absolutely no way forward planning can make a difference at times. We are at the will of a constantly changing system. Anyway thankfully she allowed me to pay but she did say the town hall won't receive the money until the 12th and that may cause a problem tomorrow but hopefully not.

When we came out of the bank. Our lass who is Spanish, so she knows the system well, said "she felt like she'd been on a two day Lord of the Rings style quest. :)

It can be incredibly draining and often unsuccessful.
 


I've had experience of Spanish bureaucracy and it's awful and soul destroying. Italian bureaucracy is even worse though. They are absolutely f***ing useless here like. It seems that nobody actually knows how to do their job and passing the buck is what they do best. Organising a pissup in a brewery would be impossible.
 
Some of the replies on here from the Brexiters and assorted old right wing loons are fantastic

People who voted for things to be different apparently baffled that things aren't exactly the same as they were before

NO HAY SUFICIENTES CITAS DISPONIBLES

It's been like that for over 6 months now.

Nah, it used to be easy. The last time before Covid, I had to wait months for a padrón appointment. The Mrs is from Elda. Maybe I'd be better getting in done there in the summer. Not the padrón the tie. I even signed up for the digital signature thing. But can't get the padrón their either.

I renewed my Padron using a machine in the library.... don't know if that works where you are?
Nothing here at the minute. A mate go in early and managed to make an appointment last October. It's for next month I believe.

Nothing here at the minute. A mate got in early and managed to make an appointment last October. It's for next month I believe.

Much easier up here in Barcelona


Collins dictionary

Definition of 'expatriate'

expatriate
(ekspætriət , -peɪt- )
Word forms: plural expatriates
countable noun
An expatriate is someone who is living in a country which is not their own.
...British expatriates in Spain.
Synonyms: exile, refugee, emigrant, émigré More Synonyms of expatriate
Expatriate is also an adjective.


Does it really matter?

I intend to describe myself as an emigre from now on
 
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Keawyeds

Striker
That isn't true.

Except that's actually the definition.

I'd also accept "Economic Migrant", but "Ex-Pat" is just bollocks. If they're not working, they've emigrated there and therefore are immigrants

Interestingly...
Immigrate–What's the Difference?
Emigrate means to leave one location, such as one's native country or region, to live in another. Immigrate means to move into a non-native country or region to live.

I've "emigrated" from the north east, to Hull for Uni and then Manchester for work and now Bolton.
 
you'll find it is.
I deal in facts.
Except that's actually the definition.

I'd also accept "Economic Migrant", but "Ex-Pat" is just bollocks. If they're not working, they've emigrated there and therefore are immigrants

Interestingly...
Immigrate–What's the Difference?
Emigrate means to leave one location, such as one's native country or region, to live in another. Immigrate means to move into a non-native country or region to live.

I've "emigrated" from the north east, to Hull for Uni and then Manchester for work and now Bolton.
An ex pat is a person living outside their native country.
 
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Vauxie

Winger
Being a proper expat I wasn't given the option to vote on Brexit, so not sure how that lad who voted to leave could possibly be an expat.
I got fucked off when I tried to renew my UK driving license years ago.
 
Some of the replies on here from the Brexiters and assorted old right wing loons are fantastic

People who voted for things to be different apparently baffled that things aren't exactly the same as they were before



I renewed my Padron using a machine in the library.... don't know if that works where you are?


Much easier up here in Barcelona


I intend to describe myself as an emigre from now on
:):):)
 
not sure how that lad who voted to leave could possibly be an expat.
Because it didn't happen .
Except that's actually the definition.

I'd also accept "Economic Migrant", but "Ex-Pat" is just bollocks. If they're not working, they've emigrated there and therefore are immigrants

Interestingly...
Immigrate–What's the Difference?
Emigrate means to leave one location, such as one's native country or region, to live in another. Immigrate means to move into a non-native country or region to live.

I've "emigrated" from the north east, to Hull for Uni and then Manchester for work and now Bolton.
You have our sympathy .
 
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Tadger

Striker
I’ve always thought you called someone an ex-pat if you’re from the point of view of the person’s native land, like I’d call a Brit living in Spain an ex-Pat and a Spaniard would call another Spaniard living in the UK an ex-pat or whatever the Spanish equivalent to that is.
 
Some of the replies on here from the Brexiters and assorted old right wing loons are fantastic

People who voted for things to be different apparently baffled that things aren't exactly the same as they were before



I renewed my Padron using a machine in the library.... don't know if that works where you are?


Much easier up here in Barcelona


I intend to describe myself as an emigre from now on
I'm going to be an "expatriado" which simply means "someone who doesn't live in his own country". It definitely doesn't mean I am a nazi and proud brexiteer who believes the Spanish should be forced to live somewhere else .
I’ve always thought you called someone an ex-pat if you’re from the point of view of the person’s native land, like I’d call a Brit living in Spain an ex-Pat and a Spaniard would call another Spaniard living in the UK an ex-pat or whatever the Spanish equivalent to that is.
You're right, it's expatriado .
 
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Keawyeds

Striker
Not according to the dictionary.

If it is semantics then they can be ex pats.
a person who has come to live permanently in a country that is not their own
immigrant communities/families/workers


That'll be an immigrant then, not an "expat". as we've already covered
I’ve always thought you called someone an ex-pat if you’re from the point of view of the person’s native land, like I’d call a Brit living in Spain an ex-Pat and a Spaniard would call another Spaniard living in the UK an ex-pat or whatever the Spanish equivalent to that is.

Except chances are a Spaniard living in the UK would probably be called an immigrant, not an "expat"
You have our sympathy .

Cheeky blighter :lol:
 
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