Reclining your seat during a flight:

ontap

Striker
Filming it like a gonk instead of engaging in civilised discussion. Common courtesy would suggest she should ask before reclining, although she may well have done.

As I said, what happened to verbal communication? We have someone going on like a caveman and someone else going on like they've never had face to face interaction with anyone. Bizarre times.
There's no communicating with s complete moron who is punching your seat throughout the flight ffs. She did the right thing and communicated the situation to the steward , who decided to ignore her and let the Bully continue ,bad I said she should be suing the airline.
 
I always use the eating or drinking technique to have them move the seat back to normal. Once the bait comes round ask them to move it forward. Keep a drink on your tray and if they try and move it back tell them you are still eating and drinking and to keep it up right.
Just jam a rolled up magazine between the arm of the table and the back of the chair

The way the chair/ table is constructed stops the chair reclining
 
There's no communicating with s complete moron who is punching your seat throughout the flight ffs. She did the right thing and communicated the situation to the steward , who decided to ignore her and let the Bully continue ,bad I said she should be suing the airline.

I rarely recline my seat on long haul but coming back from the states a few weeks ago on an overnight flight I thought nowt off it.
I almost came to blows with the bellend behind me who, instead of just saying excuse me mate" decided to start kicking and punching the back of my seat. His arse went when I got up mind.

I've got a nine and a half hour flight Heathrow to Miami (cattle class) on Monday, not looking forward to that fcker






what I didn't mention in the above is that when i stood up and had a go back at him he almost started crying and the stewardess moved him to a business class seat


:evil::evil::evil:
 

ontap

Striker

I rarely recline my seat on long haul but coming back from the states a few weeks ago on an overnight flight I thought nowt off it.
I almost came to blows with the bellend behind me who, instead of just saying excuse me mate" decided to start kicking and punching the back of my seat. His arse went when I got up mind.

I've got a nine and a half hour flight Heathrow to Miami (cattle class) on Monday, not looking forward to that fcker






what I didn't mention in the above is that when i stood up and had a go back at him he almost started crying and the stewardess moved him to a business class seat


:evil::evil::evil:
People posting that she was wrong imo have never travelled long haul , when I first started flying to the west coast of the USA twenty years ago , I never reclined my seat , being 6' plus , I couldn't sleep with my seat upright , so like a fool I just put up with it. First time I tried reclining it was a whole different experience , although to be fair am talking about premium not economy.
 
People posting that she was wrong imo have never travelled long haul , when I first started flying to the west coast of the USA twenty years ago , I never reclined my seat , being 6' plus , I couldn't sleep with my seat upright , so like a fool I just put up with it. First time I tried reclining it was a whole different experience , although to be fair am talking about premium not economy.
I flew long, medium and short regularly last year. If i'm just on a two or three hour flight i wouldn't dream of putting my seat back. Anything over say six hours I probably would as I usually have to work on arrival when going out to a job.
Long haul back from the states or Caribbean is always an overnight flight and virtually everyone puts their seat back and tries to get what kip they can.
It's not uncommon to hear some squabble somewhere on the plane as someone complains about the passenger in front reclining. I've seen people wake up, realise the seat in front is reclined and then complain.
 
Filming it like a gonk instead of engaging in civilised discussion. Common courtesy would suggest she should ask before reclining, although she may well have done.

As I said, what happened to verbal communication? We have someone going on like a caveman and someone else going on like they've never had face to face interaction with anyone. Bizarre times.
Thing with asking is, what if they say no and the person in front of you refuses to put their seat up? Do you just put up with it?

If you don't want the person in front of you reclining, you're really saying nobody on the plane can. It's a bit like standing up at the football. Excuse me mate, I can't see the game - well the 20 rows in front of me are standing up so unless I stand up I'm staring at some guy's back side.
 

rey mysterio

Midfield
Unless it was causing him great pain I don’t see his issue.

One of the worst experiences of my life was getting on a Jet2 plane after flying Emirates Business class. “Where’s my TV? where’s my
Minibar? Where’s my gently warmed mix of nuts? Why won’t my seat recline?”

To compound my misery I stood in the line for the bog and some lad in front of me for a laugh opened the stewardesses little curtain where she was sitting. She looked at me with an evil look then slammed the curtain back shut. Later when they were selling cans of warm Stella for £5 she “accidentally” poured one on me.
 

duff_man

Striker
Nah, if it was going tits up and they couldn't get to an airport they head out to the water.
No they don’t.

Why would you want an emergency landing on water where the plane is likely to break up and begin sinking and where the emergency and rescue services would find it harder to carry out their roles?
 

dangermows

Striker
No they don’t.

Why would you want an emergency landing on water where the plane is likely to break up and begin sinking and where the emergency and rescue services would find it harder to carry out their roles?
They do. And have done. (Alaska 261 is an example). They did so to avoid further casualties on the ground.
 

duff_man

Striker
They do. And have done. (Alaska 261 is an example). They did so to avoid further casualties on the ground.
They would avoid built up areas obviously. Why would they ditch in the sea where a rescue of those on board, who didn’t drown when the aircraft splits and sinks, would be so much more difficult?
 

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