Learning the Piano

Discussion in 'SMB' started by Richy Fingers, Feb 1, 2019.

  1. There's a couple about but not as many. There's one in the portico at Newcastle station and one in the paved area in the middle of Sunderland city centre uni campus.
     
    T_Bone likes this.
  2. bigmarlon

    bigmarlon Midfield

    Bloke in shades is 'Mr Boogie Woogie', older fella was apparently on Britain's Got Talent. What happens when they meet at a tube station piano..? :p


    Then there's this fella...
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2019
    peachbum and Ginger John like this.
  3. matt228

    matt228 Midfield Contributor

    It's never too late! Practise every day for a short amount of time, rather than once a week for an hour. There are dozens of good books which will guide you through the process. The books I used at the start were aimed at children (I was 7) so I wouldn't particularly recommend them to someone your age.

    I'd also highly recommend having some lessons to structure your learning and give you a target to aim for. I'm a piano teacher, though, so maybe I'm somewhat biased. I haven't had lessons for a few years due to travelling and suchlike but I'm going to have a teacher again when I'm back in the UK this summer as I want some help tackling this next piece:
     
    bigmarlon likes this.
  4. bigmarlon

    bigmarlon Midfield

    Jesus christ. I can safely say that piece of music is one I'll never be able to play. :lol:

    At 0:51 Ignoring the layers of ledger liners that'd give me nightmares.. for some bars it's alternating between naturals and accidentals, all whilst remembering that you're playing C,D,F and G sharps in the first fucking place (or flats in this case)! :lol: It'd take me years to figure that twat out.
     
    matt228 likes this.
  5. matt228

    matt228 Midfield Contributor

    And that's without considering the fact that for many bars your left hand is playing triplet quavers to the right hand's regular semiquavers. :lol:

    I know I can do it but I am going to need a teacher to guide me as it's too hard for me to teach myself in under a year!
     
    bigmarlon likes this.
  6. bigmarlon

    bigmarlon Midfield

    Well at least he's done the courtesy of putting a few finger placement notations in there :lol: I wish you luck marra.

    If you ever do give it a go make sure you share it on here ffs.
     
    matt228 likes this.
  7. Ruffusdoofus

    Ruffusdoofus Subs Bench

    I don't play the piano myself but my daughter takes GCSE music so knows a little bit about piano even though it's not her main thing.

    She says she just repeats the chords C G Am and F and you can play so many songs with it apparently. Her favourite to play is Torn by Natalie Imbruglia. Try it with any songs you want to play.

    Not an amazing way to play the piano but It works
     
  8. matt228

    matt228 Midfield Contributor

    Treble clef: every good boy deserves favour (lines), face (spaces)

    Bass clef: good boy deserves favour always (lines), all cows eat grass (spaces)

    Thanks, mate. I'll definitely share it. I have a video somewhere of me playing Flight of the Bumblebee but I think it's been lost in the ether. Next time, I'll record it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2019
    bigmarlon likes this.
  9. bigmarlon

    bigmarlon Midfield

    Aye it's just the bass clef that catches me off-guard when I'm trying to read something new. I have to consciously think "g,b,d,f,a a,c,e,g" while I'm reading it otherwise I'll play them as trebles. Mind, I only started 2 months ago so I'm not deeing too bad! I didn't even know what a bloody clef was man.
     
    matt228 likes this.
  10. CatRyan

    CatRyan Striker

    My mate just sent me a guitar tune he is writing and asked me about putting an alto clef viola bit to it. Excited :D.
    I can still do that stuff even with a bobbins little finger.
     
    bigmarlon likes this.
  11. bigmarlon

    bigmarlon Midfield

    It wasn't @niceonemarra was it? :p:lol:

    Well make sure you share it with us when it's finished, Cat. Don't be shy!
     
  12. CatRyan

    CatRyan Striker

    Don't know how to share an audio file from whatsapp:confused:
    Can't even post pictures on here anymore:lol:
     
    bigmarlon likes this.
  13. bigmarlon

    bigmarlon Midfield

    I'm not surprised after a 6 month bloody ban. Ridiculous that man.
     
  14. matt228

    matt228 Midfield Contributor

    You'll get there. Keep at it! Did I mention I teach? ;)
     
    bigmarlon likes this.
  15. bigmarlon

    bigmarlon Midfield

    I'll know who to PM if I ever have a question about the difference between ritardando and ritenuto :p:lol:
     
    matt228 likes this.
  16. matt228

    matt228 Midfield Contributor

    Ritenuto (held back) is a sudden drop in tempo.

    Ritardando and rallentando (slowing down) are exactly the same as far as I know, and it's more gradual.
     
    bigmarlon likes this.
  17. DaveH

    DaveH Striker

    I always found I was slow at reading music and translating that to what my fingers were doing. By the time I figured that out for a bar or two, I would lose where I am. I was helping my son with guitar lessons the other day and struggled to follow the book he had, as that was sheet music. I read guitar tab - that is easy. My wife just bought a keyboard, so now I have double motivation to learn.

    I did piano lessons as a kid, but had no interest in the classical style music he wanted me to play. He said he would teach me rock keyboard when I had got my grade 8 in a few years time. I got by in practice by having a good memory, memorising the piece and pretending I was sight reading the music, but lost interest because it was not what I wanted to play.

    I downloaded an app yesterday, Music Tutor. This flashes up a musical note and you click A,B etc. I was going to try with that for a few weeks, so I can practice reading anywhere when I have the odd 5 minutes. I’m hoping that guitar or keyboard, once I know the notes I should be playing it will be far easier that sitting going ‘every green bus drives fast’ each note.
     
    bigmarlon likes this.
  18. CatRyan

    CatRyan Striker

    There used to be a little red book called the Rudiments of Music by the Associated Board of Music I think.
    In the days before the internet but indispensable back then and you had to learn it for your grade 5 theory, which you had to pass before doing grade 6.

    I tend to take ritardando as a steady upright slowing down and rallentando as a more leaning back weighted slowing down.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2019
    matt228 and bigmarlon like this.
  19. matt228

    matt228 Midfield Contributor

    I’m not sure I have ever consciously differentiated the two! Interesting take. The descriptions don’t really make sense I could explain, but somehow I think I know what you mean.
     
  20. CatRyan

    CatRyan Striker

    As a violinist I have a lot more elasticity than I did when playing piano. So you can lean into a note. With rit. I would plumb on the note like pebbles dropping in a well with Ral. I would swing into the note, not glissando but just more like a drunk person going up stairs.
     
    matt228 likes this.

Share This Page