Kicking off in La Palma, Canary Islands

lurker

Striker
I hold admiration and disbelief in equal measure for the person who filmed that.
Yes, it’s flowing slowly and at a constant rate, but if it were to break, they’d be caught out.
Imagine the difference between cold oil and hot oil in a pan tilted to a gradient.
That flow Is slow as it’s cooling. Very easy for a hotter more viscous flow to break the head wall.
I’m sure as long as you had a fire extinguisher nearby you’d be fine man.
 


Amokachi

Goalkeeper
I've had multiple dreams featuring volcanos erupting lately.
Is the world about to end?
What would that mean for Sunderland?
 
Volcanologists are nutters, on the whole. They are adventurous nerds; adrenaline anoraks.

They get as close to the danger zone as possible, often hazing the margins of error. Deaths are pretty rare, though, and are usually as a result of pyroclastic flows, which are possible here. They travel at up to 430mph, so when they happen it's not possible to get out of the way.

The scientists in Iceland took a break and cooked hotdogs on the lava 😮

 

Monty Pigeon

Striker
I've had multiple dreams featuring volcanos erupting lately.
Is the world about to end?
What would that mean for Sunderland?

Mind, it'd be a laugh if the end of the world happens before Newcastle United get to spend their billions in the January transfer window.
 

Monty Pigeon

Striker
Aren't the Canary Islands a volcanic chain? Will the rest blow or is this isolated in La Palma?

Yes, they're similar to Hawaii. But different in a key aspect. Hawaii sits on a fixed hotspot, and the islands move westward once they've formed, eroding as they go. Big Island is being formed at one end, Midway Atoll is the remnant of a once big island at the other.

The Canaries move eastward, so Lanzarote is the oldest. However, their hotspot is more a fissure, so it's possible, for instance, for the volcano on Tenerife to become active again.

In general, however, El Hierro and La Palma are the ones most likely to have eruptions because they are still being formed.
 
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Reubens tasche

Central Defender
Yes, they're similar to Hawaii. But different in a key aspect. Hawaii sits on a fixed hotspot, and the islands move westward once they've formed, eroding as they go. Big Island is being formed at one end, Midway Atoll is the remnant of a once big island at the other.

The Canaries move eastward, so Lanzarote is the oldest. However, their hotspot is more a fissure, so it's possible, for instance, for the volcano on Tenerife to become active again.

In general, however, El Hierro and La Palma are the ones most likely to have eruptions because they are still being formed.
Goin to a hotel at the bank of the volcano at playa Blanca, lanzarote next month so if it can hold off 6 weeks that’d be grand cheers
 

Darlo1973

Striker
Goin to a hotel at the bank of the volcano at playa Blanca, lanzarote next month so if it can hold off 6 weeks that’d be grand cheers
There hasn't been a significant eruption on Lanzarote since 1824 and the last big one was a century earlier so I would guess you'll be OK.

If you haven't done it before the volcano tour is worth doing. Not as high as Tenerife but the landscape is spectacular.
 
Goin to a hotel at the bank of the volcano at playa Blanca, lanzarote next month so if it can hold off 6 weeks that’d be grand cheers

As well as the volcano tour, César Manrique's volcano house is brilliant. Also visit the lava tubes to see the blind albino crabs. It's the only place they live in the whole world.

If UD Lanzarote are playing at home, you can go to the match.
 

Monty Pigeon

Striker
Yes but there is a huge variety of activities across the islands. La Gomera has been extinct for 3 million years while others haven't had a significant event in centuries. La Palma is the most active.

Tenerife's Teide volcano is the one that's being most closely monitored. It last erupted in 1909, and seemed to be building up for an eruption about 15 years ago, but then quietened down again. While all the attention is on La Palma, there's also a team on Teide intensively monitoring any changes. The links between the various islands are not fully understood, and there remains the possibility that activity on one island could set another off.
 

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