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Kicking off in La Palma, Canary Islands

D

Deleted member 22590

Guest
More eruptions today- 4th now I understand. Is this the volacano going up for real and if so, what’s the chances of a doomsday like scenario?
 


Monty Pigeon

Striker
More eruptions today- 4th now I understand. Is this the volacano going up for real and if so, what’s the chances of a doomsday like scenario?

As mentioned earlier in the threat, it's increasingly likely that this will be an effusive eruption rather than an explosive eruption. It'll push out huge amounts of slow-flowing magma that will reshape the island, but there won't be the huge explosion, landslide and mega-tsunami that one model predicted 20 years ago (but which has largely been debunked since then).

The biggest fear at the moment is that when the magma reaches the sea it'll emit clouds of deadly gas, which will be a hazard for people on the island. The progress of the magma has been slower than anticipated, and so far it hasn't yet reached the water.

The volcano is still huffing away. Beautiful timelapse this morning.

The latest lava flow map.

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0verlord44

Central Defender
Was reading today that when Krakatoa went up, it was hear, yes heard, in Alice springs Australia. 65 miles away, a British ship recorded over 150db (through a barometer i assume) which is the equivalent of standing next to a Saturn 5 when somebody turns the keys..
Most of the ships crew had burst ear drums, unsurprisingly
 

Monty Pigeon

Striker
Live feed of the La Palma eruption. It's been very active today.

The lava has just crossed the coastal highway. When it reaches the sea, the eruption enters a new phase. There are fears that some of the cliffs will collapse. More insidiously, the gas will turn to hydrochloric acid and the ash will turn into minute shards of glass that can be inhaled by anyone foolish enough to be in the exclusion zone.

 
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royaldragon

Winger
The volcano in La Palma is getting worse, loads of lava flowing down towards the sea and the vent is getting bigger, and plenty of earthquakes happening, this is going to get worse before things improve, just hope it doesn't get too serious.


 

Monty Pigeon

Striker

johnhp

Full Back
Fingers crossed no eruptions, last thing we need now is a boomer and an ash cloud
Its not that type of volcano for lots of ash you need a ice lake on top of volcano and lots of ice. what is worrying is the eq the dome at the crater already collapsed and created 3 more vents
 

Monty Pigeon

Striker
That is a brave place to stand.

Volcanologists are nutters, on the whole. They are adventurous nerds; adrenaline anoraks.

They get as close to the danger zone as possible, often hazing the margins of error. Deaths are pretty rare, though, and are usually as a result of pyroclastic flows, which are possible here. They travel at up to 430mph, so when they happen it's not possible to get out of the way.
 

johnhp

Full Back
Volcanologists are nutters, on the whole. They are adventurous nerds; adrenaline anoraks.

They get as close to the danger zone as possible, often hazing the margins of error. Deaths are pretty rare, though, and are usually as a result of pyroclastic flows, which are possible here. They travel at up to 430mph, so when they happen it's not possible to get out of the way.
Want to watch some nutters its on sky q were actully 2 weeks ahead of America for once... storm rising tornado chasers read timmer
 

T_Bone

Striker
My daughter has a friend who lives there. She and her two kids have been forced to go to Tenerife. Her husband has had to stay but they have been told their house is in the track of the lava flow.
Not good for them
 

Kevj

Striker
Volcanologists are nutters, on the whole. They are adventurous nerds; adrenaline anoraks.

They get as close to the danger zone as possible, often hazing the margins of error. Deaths are pretty rare, though, and are usually as a result of pyroclastic flows, which are possible here. They travel at up to 430mph, so when they happen it's not possible to get out of the way.

I hold admiration and disbelief in equal measure for the person who filmed that.
Yes, it’s flowing slowly and at a constant rate, but if it were to break, they’d be caught out.
Imagine the difference between cold oil and hot oil in a pan tilted to a gradient.
That flow Is slow as it’s cooling. Very easy for a hotter more viscous flow to break the head wall.
 
My friend who lives in Lanzarote took the ferry over. Seems quite a popular tourist attraction but you have to keep wiping the ash off you. Even though you can't really get near, it sounds like planes taking off right next to you. Apparently she confused the crap out of Reuters who tried to interview her, but not managed to find any video as yet.
 

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