Keeping a large garden in check



We have a trio of gardeners who do one day in every ten but even with a third of the garden being woodland and a portion being left wild for the summer they still struggle to keep it under control.
 
It's not a lawn, a lot of stones which I am slowly clearing, plus not perfectly level, hence the slowness.
To be honest the last time I did it, it may have killed my mower.
Thinking an industrial strimmer may be the way.
Why dont you pay someone to start it, get the stones out, get it into a position that’s more easily manageable and then take it in from there? Maybe get them in once in a while if it starts getting out of hand?
 

DaveH

Striker
Ours is a right mess as it has ivy all awa and it’s a constant battle to keep on top of it. The lawns a clip as well but I’m not that arsed enough to spend a fortune on plastic grass.I bought a load of miracle gro lawn feed a few weeks ago and it’s only slightly better.
I just bypass any responsibility by describing it as ‘mature’ and the fact that the ivy at the back is so massively overgrown that it would prevent any would be intruders from getting in.
But as far as advice goes I’d recommend timberline-roe based in leechmere. Lad whose company is is a mate and has all the gear as well as the expertise to sort any garden issues you might have.
I would ask yourself the question, does the lawn need to be a bowling green? There is a very British thing that lawns need to be perfect, well cut and weed free. I know I've found it hard to break that mindset.

I have loads of buttercups, clover and daisies in mine, and they see to come back into flowering just a couple of days after cutting it. I like the look of it and it is great for bees. It would be a lot of work (probably chemicals too) to get it to just grass, so I'm leaving it.

The fence along the back is mostly held together by ivy now. You can't see fence at all, just a thick ivy hedge. I quite like the look of it and where one panel has come away from the post, I'm just going to chuck another post in to support it. I did think of replacing a couple of panels, but then I'd be left with a fence to look at rather than the thick ivy. Ivy is great for robins and blackbirds to nest in.
 
Let it go wild. Then add an old settee or two, a knackered electric cooker (it must be electric), and as many old car parts and tyres as you can find.
There you go. Landscaping on the cheap.
 

Decentdaysandnights

Central Defender
I would ask yourself the question, does the lawn need to be a bowling green? There is a very British thing that lawns need to be perfect, well cut and weed free. I know I've found it hard to break that mindset.

I have loads of buttercups, clover and daisies in mine, and they see to come back into flowering just a couple of days after cutting it. I like the look of it and it is great for bees. It would be a lot of work (probably chemicals too) to get it to just grass, so I'm leaving it.

The fence along the back is mostly held together by ivy now. You can't see fence at all, just a thick ivy hedge. I quite like the look of it and where one panel has come away from the post, I'm just going to chuck another post in to support it. I did think of replacing a couple of panels, but then I'd be left with a fence to look at rather than the thick ivy. Ivy is great for robins and blackbirds to nest in.
I think my fence is probably also held together with ivy now but we also get robins in the garden often.
We are potentially getting a dog next year so it’s ideal for a small dog to run about in. There’s still a concrete area where we have a table and chairs so it’s not a complete lost cause yet 😂
 
Advice appreciated.

Currently renovating a property with a large garden that we are moving into shortly.
Spending all my time working on the house but keeping the garden in check is killing me.

Weed killer application took me hours and was a complete bust frankly.
Using a strimmer and lawn mower takes me two days and it's back in three weeks.
Thinking of a rotavator to just turn the soil, though no idea long that will take to do?
Happy to spend a few bob on a machine that will save me.

How many bedrooms you got mate?

What car you driving?

Might aswell get the cock waving out the way
 

DaveH

Striker
I think my fence is probably also held together with ivy now but we also get robins in the garden often.
We are potentially getting a dog next year so it’s ideal for a small dog to run about in. There’s still a concrete area where we have a table and chairs so it’s not a complete lost cause yet 😂
You need to make sure it is secure then before a dog. We had loads of laylandi (Leslandes? - big quick growing trees) pine at the bottom of the garden, all in a thick line, planted far too close together. I didn't realise how bad a state the fence was behind. Shortly after moving in we suddenly realised the dog had disappeared. He had got through, went through the garden out the back into their street then went wandering. He was cross lab and just went looking for food - they are always hungry. He was found by a house of students half a mile away. We had not got his tag updated so still had the number of the old house on there. We had been living with the inlaws for months while moving so it was better than knocking on the door of strangers (you bought my house, now can you help me find me dog?).
 

Kevj

Striker
I would ask yourself the question, does the lawn need to be a bowling green? There is a very British thing that lawns need to be perfect, well cut and weed free. I know I've found it hard to break that mindset.

I have loads of buttercups, clover and daisies in mine, and they see to come back into flowering just a couple of days after cutting it. I like the look of it and it is great for bees. It would be a lot of work (probably chemicals too) to get it to just grass, so I'm leaving it.

The fence along the back is mostly held together by ivy now. You can't see fence at all, just a thick ivy hedge. I quite like the look of it and where one panel has come away from the post, I'm just going to chuck another post in to support it. I did think of replacing a couple of panels, but then I'd be left with a fence to look at rather than the thick ivy. Ivy is great for robins and blackbirds to nest in.

My old house had a back garden which was predominantly some for of moss, but had lovely blue miniature flowers which looked lovely. To the point I didn’t scarify or attempt to remove it. It grew slower than grass too.
 

Big Toe

Central Defender
Definitely get a gardener. I had one, then he retired so for the past 2 years I’ve been doing it myself. Cutting the grass 1 or 2 times a week and it’s never looked better. Desperate for a gardener again cause it’s becoming an obsession. Problem is, it won’t look as good with a gardener as they don’t do it as often so I’ll probably give it a few cuts between them coming.
 

Gene Hunt

Central Defender
Bought a new build 2 years ago. Battled for ages with the developer about the lack of drainage. Got nowhere, decided to get it landscaped anyway. £20k later, the developer insisted on rotovating the remaining lawn (we hadn't touched the lawn, just added new patios/borders etc). Now the instagram garden looks like the somme whilst I wait for these ***** to come and lay new turf
At least half of that £20k will be in the landscaper’s back pocket. Scandalous prices they quote
 

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