Disasters, would you survive? Mainly info about the MS Estonia sinking in 1994

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I just watched this as I've been watching the Zero Hour series recently and another shocking disaster that shouldn't have really happened.


I recall parts of it but I did a little reading on it such as wiki etc and didn't know that out of the 989, only 137 survived and 852 died. It could also have held up to 2,000 passengers so was only at half capacity.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS_Estonia

I then found this page! If you can read it without distractions and like reading then I suggest you read it as you will be absorbed I'm sure.

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2004/05/a-sea-story/302940/

You can also click on the survivors on the website below and read some of their accounts and again, it's absorbing reading.

http://estonia94.blogspot.it/

I can't imagine what it must be like to be in a situation like that and whether I'd survive or not. It was mostly young lads who survived the Estonia due to the way it listed so quickly. I certainly wouldn't be one of the ones who freeze with fear and I'd like to think I'd still be able to think about what I feel is the best thing to do to escape.

There's been other ship disasters such as the Zeebrugge, Costa Concordia but it's planes that would be my main concern. I guess I've watched far too many Mayday programs that when I get on a plane I'm wondering what every fucking noise, vibration etc could possibly be! :lol:

I know some of survivors survive purely by luck of where they are at a particular time but some will survive by their instinct. Do you think you have that survival instinct?

Has anyone been in any disaster/incident that claimed lives? I couldn't imagine the memories of such an event being with you for the rest of your life. It's bad enough with trivial things in life that were shit being etched permanently in your mind but something like that must be unbearable, especially just after it.


These are the rest of the Zero Hour documentaries and some are interesting to watch. I just watched the Space Shuttle Columbia one and I was shaking my head in disbelief as to what happened!



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VgEBvUd72xo&list=PLOSUbOXToHM2d_WY8ffm7DVKRFWTQ547J
 

Zidane

Winger
I've read in a few places that although some do survive by pure luck, being in the right place when disaster strikes, many survive by acting very quickly.

Those that hang around pondering what to do inevitably die.

Get out quick, whether that be a building, ship whatever, is the best plan.
 
I've read in a few places that although some do survive by pure luck, being in the right place when disaster strikes, many survive by acting very quickly.

Those that hang around pondering what to do inevitably die.

Get out quick, whether that be a building, ship whatever, is the best plan.
Exactly, first signs of danger act quickly and start thinking of possibilities. My only concern being, I recall my last trip on a ship I got hammered so I guess I'd have died in a disaster like the Estonia :neutral:
 

danftm

Central Defender
Good read that article, would have been nice to know how long they had to wait before they got picked up. Managed to kill an hour at work and now I only have 20 minutes left so I thank you!

I don't know what I'd do in a situation like that. I'd like to think I'd be savy enough and calm enough to survive; but until you are there I guess you'll never know.
 
Best thing to do in any situation is to first cripple your lasses legs so they don't weigh you down / hold you back, put your head down and run for te exit / safe place ;)


This technique works wonders in Primark
 
Good read that article, would have been nice to know how long they had to wait before they got picked up. Managed to kill an hour at work and now I only have 20 minutes left so I thank you!

I don't know what I'd do in a situation like that. I'd like to think I'd be savy enough and calm enough to survive; but until you are there I guess you'll never know.
It looks like it was a couple of hours before other ferries and helicopters arrived so not quick enough for anyone who was in the water.

I recall the sinking but obviously back then didn't take in the info enough to recall it nearly 20 years later. I'm shocked at exactly what went on, how it could have been different and just how high the death toll was!

Best thing to do in any situation is to first cripple your lasses legs so they don't weigh you down / hold you back, put your head down and run for the exit / safe place ;)

This technique works wonders in Primark
I know you are joking (well maybe not as this is the SMB ;)) but there was one lad (23 yrs old) in the documentary who survived but had to leave his parents (46 & 48) and his lass (25) behind as they couldn't make it across the gap to safety .

This is halfway down that link and is also shown in the documentary.

One of the survivors, a young man who had been trying to guide his parents and his girlfriend to safety, got separated from them in the chaos while gaining the stairs. When he looked back to find them, it was obvious that they would be incapable of negotiating the open space, across which increasing numbers of people were fatally sliding. His parents shouted at him to save himself, as did his girlfriend. It was practical advice. There was no time to linger over the decision. He turned and continued on alone.

His actual account of it is here if anyone has time to waste.

http://estonia94.blogspot.it/2013/09/magnus-erik-lindstrom.html

It must have been fucking horrible to leave them but I don't blame him. No doubt you'd give your life for your bairns but I guess the natural instinct to survive would kick in even in his case and you'd also leave them behind if they were saying go. I'd certainly stay if it was young bairns as how could you even think about leaving them even if you knew you'd die? Sadly, looking at the list of survivors it looks very few under 17 years old survived the Estonia apart from a 12 and two 15 year olds (source) but I don't know how many kids were on the ship. Only 7 or 8 people over 55 survived but probably due to being in the right place at the wrong time. That list isn't fact but has been collected over the years but even so the lack of kids is very sad! :cry:
 

Skandhaless

Striker
It looks like it was a couple of hours before other ferries and helicopters arrived so not quick enough for anyone who was in the water.

I recall the sinking but obviously back then didn't take in the info enough to recall it nearly 20 years later. I'm shocked at exactly what went on, how it could have been different and just how high the death toll was!



I know you are joking (well maybe not as this is the SMB ;)) but there was one lad (23 yrs old) in the documentary who survived but had to leave his parents (46 & 48) and his lass (25) behind as they couldn't make it across the gap to safety .

This is halfway down that link and is also shown in the documentary.

One of the survivors, a young man who had been trying to guide his parents and his girlfriend to safety, got separated from them in the chaos while gaining the stairs. When he looked back to find them, it was obvious that they would be incapable of negotiating the open space, across which increasing numbers of people were fatally sliding. His parents shouted at him to save himself, as did his girlfriend. It was practical advice. There was no time to linger over the decision. He turned and continued on alone.

His actual account of it is here if anyone has time to waste.

http://estonia94.blogspot.it/2013/09/magnus-erik-lindstrom.html

It must have been fucking horrible to leave them but I don't blame him. No doubt you'd give your life for your bairns but I guess the natural instinct to survive would kick in even in his case and you'd also leave them behind if they were saying go. I'd certainly stay if it was young bairns as how could you even think about leaving them even if you knew you'd die? Sadly, looking at the list of survivors it looks very few under 17 years old survived the Estonia apart from a 12 and two 15 year olds (source) but I don't know how many kids were on the ship. Only 7 or 8 people over 55 survived but probably due to being in the right place at the wrong time. That list isn't fact but has been collected over the years but even so the lack of kids is very sad! :cry:
I would of stayed with our lass probably , then again I'm 56 so would probably cork it anyway . Not worried , shit happens .
 
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