Calgon discussion thread



[QUOTE="becs, post: 31720759, member: 1525"


My friends little boy used to sing "washing machines live longer with Calpol" 😂
[/QUOTE]

Class Becs , my sister in law used to look after our nephew after school he knew it was coming up to half term and he asked her “what day do we crack up Auntie S?” she replied “most days but we break up on Friday “ 😄😄😄😄
 
Anyone use this? I think it’s a massive con me. Washing machines supposedly last longer with calgon. My last washer lasted 12 years and I was tired of it all by the time it went kaput. If I’d spent £100 a year on calgon I highly doubt I’d have got another few year out of it. Washers cost fuck all anyway who cares if it blows up.
Just hoy a cup of white vinegar in on hot wash mate now and then mate, much cheaper.
 
Anyone use this? I think it’s a massive con me. Washing machines supposedly last longer with calgon. My last washer lasted 12 years and I was tired of it all by the time it went kaput. If I’d spent £100 a year on calgon I highly doubt I’d have got another few year out of it. Washers cost fuck all anyway who cares if it blows up.
Never used it, my Samsung washer is 13 years old and still going strong :cool:
 
Calgon is just a water softener. We don't have particularly hard water in the North East.
Not true
If you know what the scale-forming salts are, and where they come from, you'll know whether to use a product like Cal(cium)gon or not. The NE is a medium to soft water so calcium and magnesium salts are relatively low. North Wales, the Lakes and all the way up through the Scottish highlands are very low and the water is very soft (no scaling salts, check your kettle element). London and the south east in particular sits on top of huge chalk deposits so ground water is loaded with calcium. Rainwater is pure, but when it falls it absorbs CO2 from the atmosphere and becomes acidic (mildly carbonic), and will absorb chalk present in the ground. Any area built on bedrock, slate or granite will be soft water. An area on chalk will be hard, to differing degrees. Buying Calgon in the NE is a waste of money unless you're using water on an industrial scale.
The Northeast, or even Sunderland hasn't got one type of water. It goes from very hard to soft.
 
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Strawbs were class

Central Defender
On a related note, I’ve noticed the amount of calcium in the water has gone up of late. The kettle needs descaling once a month if not more (used to be every six month) and the cold water dispenser on the fridge is beginning to jam open. Something is afoot.
They have probably switched us back onto the Fulwell borehole
 
The Northeast, or even Sunderland hasn't got one type of water. It goes from very hard to soft.
True, to an extent. It depends on which reservoir the water is sourced (Derwent). Very hard? I doubt it. I would say medium (at worst) to soft is the norm for the NE. It also shows why a national grid for water has never been established. If you start feeding soft water into hard water areas, the damage done by dissolving scale would be large. It's only the scale that keeps some things together.
 
When they get the lip-sync right on the advert - That will be difficult seeing as how they are two different languages - then I might, might buy some.

No I wont.
 

Kevj

Striker
True, to an extent. It depends on which reservoir the water is sourced (Derwent). Very hard? I doubt it. I would say medium (at worst) to soft is the norm for the NE. It also shows why a national grid for water has never been established. If you start feeding soft water into hard water areas, the damage done by dissolving scale would be large. It's only the scale that keeps some things together.
I believe the water in Sunderland is extracted at Lumley direct from the Wear or from an underground aquifer near the coast. There will be differing levels of dissolved mineral in each.
As for mixing water sources, you are right and it also applies to localised bacterial content. When they built the pipeline from Kielder to the Tees, it is operational but only when absolutely needed (white elephant now) and they had concerned about polluting the Tyne, Wear and Tees with different concentrations of bacteria when they transfer.
 

dangermows

Striker
Nah I use Ariel powder, comfort conditionper and unstopables for nice smell. Always have done the washing, cooking and cleaning. Don’t need a lass really.
Fair play marra. Enjoy cooking but the other two, nope. Ashamed to say I wouldn't have the first clue how to do a load of washing.
 

dangermows

Striker
I pretend to our lass that I don’t know how the washing machine works.
:lol:

Said it before but tbf the missus is a bit of cleaning / housework freak (used to border on obsession) so I'm just told to stay out the way whilst she cracks on. If I nod off on the settee I wake up in a drawer.
 

OOOSH YEAH

Winger
Never used it, my Samsung washer is 13 years old and still going strong :cool:
Fuck calgon. They don’t scare us :cool:
Fair play marra. Enjoy cooking but the other two, nope. Ashamed to say I wouldn't have the first clue how to do a load of washing.
Always done it all regardless. Lived on my own 18 to 24 then 24 till 40 with my ex Then 40 till now on me own. Always did everything for myself. Not really the sort of person that relies on anyone for anything. Prefer to do it myself.
 
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True, to an extent. It depends on which reservoir the water is sourced (Derwent). Very hard? I doubt it. I would say medium (at worst) to soft is the norm for the NE. It also shows why a national grid for water has never been established. If you start feeding soft water into hard water areas, the damage done by dissolving scale would be large. It's only the scale that keeps some things together.
This has got a DEFRA map of water hardness on it


The area of Southeast Sunderland running through to Seaham etc has very hard water abstracted from boreholes in the magnesian limestone. Northumbria Water has got a grid of sorts where a number of valves across the region can be opened and closed so different water can mix.

There is 2 separate mains that run into the town centre. One with hard and the other with soft water.
 
When they built the pipeline from Kielder to the Tees, it is operational but only when absolutely needed (white elephant now) and they had concerned about polluting the Tyne, Wear and Tees with different concentrations of bacteria when they transfer.
I believe the Kielder/Tees line started off with good intentions but with subsequent bacteria/peat and water clouding it became a source of industry use only water. Don't know what it's for now. Redundant?
 

Gillythedilf

Midfield
On a related note, I’ve noticed the amount of calcium in the water has gone up of late. The kettle needs descaling once a month if not more (used to be every six month) and the cold water dispenser on the fridge is beginning to jam open. Something is afoot.
That’s the biggest downside of moving from the north to the south of the river(apart from lack of pubs)
The wata over this side is Shan
 

OOOSH YEAH

Winger
This has got a DEFRA map of water hardness on it


The area of Southeast Sunderland running through to Seaham etc has very hard water abstracted from boreholes in the magnesian limestone. Northumbria Water has got a grid of sorts where a number of valves across the region can be opened and closed so different water can mix.

There is 2 separate mains that run into the town centre. One with hard and the other with soft water.
Do you mind stating your stance on calgon if you’re going to enjoy the fruits of this interesting thread I’ve created please.
I believe the Kielder/Tees line started off with good intentions but with subsequent bacteria/peat and water clouding it became a source of industry use only water. Don't know what it's for now. Redundant?
Do you mind stating your stance on calgon if you’re going to enjoy the fruits of this interesting thread I’ve created please.
That’s the biggest downside of moving from the north to the south of the river(apart from lack of pubs)
The wata over this side is Shan
Do you mind stating your stance on calgon if you’re going to enjoy the fruits of this interesting thread I’ve created please.
 
We don't have hard water in Sunderland.
No chalk in the ground up here for a start.
Magnesian Limestone under us marra. It's more or less the same stuff. Both calcium based limestone
Do you mind stating your stance on calgon if you’re going to enjoy the fruits of this interesting thread I’ve created please.

Do you mind stating your stance on calgon if you’re going to enjoy the fruits of this interesting thread I’ve created please.

Do you mind stating your stance on calgon if you’re going to enjoy the fruits of this interesting thread I’ve created please.
I just piss in the drum mate. It does the same job
 

monkeytassle

Striker
The hardness of the water here is shocking. Shower needs viakal once a week. The head is a mess. Kettle d'escales once a week and we're on the second washer in 7y here.
 

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