Are you happy? Is your life going well?

Bob Fleming

Striker
Really difficult not to but try not thinking over things you’ve done in regards to the right choices they’ve been made and you can’t change them is how I look at it.
This is interesting and it's because I over analyse stuff. If I look back over every decision I'd made I'd a) have the perfect life and b) be richer. On the flip side I wouldnt have been where I am now.

It's like Facebook. You only see the best of what you see. 20/20 hindsight

Yep I do analyse things a lot in advance of making a decision and then afterwards. Guess it's a symptom of the job I do too. But the major decision was the one to move back to the UK and that's actually something I can change at any time but the longer I've been away and the older the kids get it's harder to move back.
When I first moved I was sure it was the right decision, then I wobbled and wasn't sure which brought on a lot of anxiety. Now I'm back to thinking it was the right decision. I doubt I'll get it out of my head but right now it's not bothering me.
 


Yep I do analyse things a lot in advance of making a decision and then afterwards. Guess it's a symptom of the job I do too. But the major decision was the one to move back to the UK and that's actually something I can change at any time but the longer I've been away and the older the kids get it's harder to move back.
When I first moved I was sure it was the right decision, then I wobbled and wasn't sure which brought on a lot of anxiety. Now I'm back to thinking it was the right decision. I doubt I'll get it out of my head but right now it's not bothering me.
You were in Aus weren’t you (apologies if I’ve got the wrong poster) hell of a decision and tbh mate I’d probably be the same thinking if it was the right thing think luckily (or unluckily ) I’ve never had to make such a decision
 

Bob Fleming

Striker
You were in Aus weren’t you (apologies if I’ve got the wrong poster) hell of a decision and tbh mate I’d probably be the same thinking if it was the right thing think luckily (or unluckily ) I’ve never had to make such a decision
Yes mate that's right. It was family versus lifestyle choice really. Very hard but lifestyle is good enough here and having some family close rather than none at all won out.
But I know that at some point it's likely at least one of the kids will use it against us, resent us for making the wrong choice. But hopefully in the fullness of time will understand. And they have the choice to go whenever they want now.
 

monkeytassle

Striker
Yep I do analyse things a lot in advance of making a decision and then afterwards. Guess it's a symptom of the job I do too. But the major decision was the one to move back to the UK and that's actually something I can change at any time but the longer I've been away and the older the kids get it's harder to move back.
When I first moved I was sure it was the right decision, then I wobbled and wasn't sure which brought on a lot of anxiety. Now I'm back to thinking it was the right decision. I doubt I'll get it out of my head but right now it's not bothering me.
Had I played it better I could have made about half a million more but that is pure hindsight. We've got the family house plus a couple of places in Paris and pretty much no debt so can't not be happy with that.
 

Kevsgreat

Striker
Used to get school reports saying I was happy enough to drift along and although I did alright I could do much better if I pushed myself.

Not much has changed tbh.
 
I’m doing OK still grieving the loss of my partner but lots to be greatful for. Our son has a lovely fiancée and they have set the date*. It’s been lovely sharing the excitement of buying their first home together and the engagement with them.

I’m fortunate to own a nice home and garden in a pleasant area with lovely neighbours. My late husband was a good provider so no worries about debt or anything like that.

I still work but only part time and my job is not stressful at all. I’m optimistic I still have much to look forward to in the future. Hope so at least.

* may even get to be a Grannie after this🤞
 

Bob Fleming

Striker
Used to get school reports saying I was happy enough to drift along and although I did alright I could do much better if I pushed myself.

Not much has changed tbh.
I got similar. Ambled along until I was 24 really then had an epiphany which put me on a much better path. But there's still an element of it. I could take things much further if I pushed even harder - but that will take more time away from my kids.
 

A Teenstone

Full Back
I think you get to a point in life (I'm 52) when you become realistic about what to expect from life. You no longer think it's an easy glide along,and, as long as it's not too unlucky and cruel (and as we all know it can be) then you're content enough.
 

Jon Dough

Winger
I think you get to a point in life (I'm 52) when you become realistic about what to expect from life. You no longer think it's an easy glide along,and, as long as it's not too unlucky and cruel (and as we all know it can be) then you're content enough.
I think at our time of life 50's we have done most of what we need to, built the foundations, the kids are educated and maybe settled, it makes us more content as you said 🙂
 
Couldn't be happier.
Consider myself retired, for all intents and purposes. Live in the sun in a nice little house. I don't for about 12 hours a week, which I don't really consider to be work, (most of the time). If I need any extra money, which isn't very often, I just do a few extra gigs.
I'm married to a woman with whom I'm still waiting for our first argument after almost eight years: we just get on and she gives me no chew at all.
I do a couple of shows with lads who are a great laugh and simply couldn't imagine being happier.

Just wish I was a bit younger so that I would have more years to enjoy it all.
 

Kent_Mackem

Striker
Couldn't be happier.
Consider myself retired, for all intents and purposes. Live in the sun in a nice little house. I don't for about 12 hours a week, which I don't really consider to be work, (most of the time). If I need any extra money, which isn't very often, I just do a few extra gigs.
I'm married to a woman with whom I'm still waiting for our first argument after almost eight years: we just get on and she gives me no chew at all.
I do a couple of shows with lads who are a great laugh and simply couldn't imagine being happier.

Just wish I was a bit younger so that I would have more years to enjoy it all.
What kind of gigs/shows are they mate?
 
I want to believe this is true but I just can't. :lol:
We have bickered occasionally, I guess, but we haven't argued.
I just don't really. Because I have no pressures in life, I have nothing to get worked up about.
During lockdown (and ours really was a lockdown, over here), we were together 24/7 for the less period and we don't have a single cross word. She's definitely a keeper, like.
What kind of gigs/shows are they mate?
A bit of everything.
Variety is the key.
I do several tribute shows (Erasure, Robbie Williams, Bay City Rollers), a comedy/vocal show. Several themed shows (80s, Soul & Motown, History of Britpop etc) and a show I call F*ck Covid: Let's Party, which can be anything from The Pistols, Buzzcocks and Undertones to Gala, Kings of Leon and Neil Diamond, depending on my mood.

I work both solo and (semi) live with keys and guitars.

It's never dull.
 
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0verlord44

Central Defender
Life’s just too short not to enjoy it. That’s what I tell myself in the difficult times

That and there’s always people much more worse off, but I have been extremely fortunate in all the important things in my life. Not bragging, It’s important to remind myself for humility
 
Yep I do analyse things a lot in advance of making a decision and then afterwards. Guess it's a symptom of the job I do too. But the major decision was the one to move back to the UK and that's actually something I can change at any time but the longer I've been away and the older the kids get it's harder to move back.
When I first moved I was sure it was the right decision, then I wobbled and wasn't sure which brought on a lot of anxiety. Now I'm back to thinking it was the right decision. I doubt I'll get it out of my head but right now it's not bothering me.
It's a bit over simplistic but I'm not sure there are good and bad decisions, just decisions that lead you on different paths. I sometimes have the same 'what if' thoughts about Oz, but if I'd stayed, there are things I would never have done and people I'd never have met.
There's another thread on the go about housing. I probably could have stopped in, saved up and bought a house as a young un. I would never have gone travelling, which gave me a lot of precious life skills that have helped in my career. A career that gave me options financially that allowed me to travel the world and to take a few years out to be a writer.
Was it the right choice? Some would have been perfectly happy with their mortgage paid off at 45 and cruising towards a civil service pension.
I try not to worry too much about 'mistakes' I've made in the past because they all lead to where I am and who I am now. If nowt else, they give me material for my books. :lol:
 

JJH

Striker
Happiness is relative . At 53 I’m happy in terms of great family …. Both teenagers maturing into decent chaps , loads of dosh , offloading a few businesses so will have the majority of my week to do what I want.Health good .
However I don’t think you ever get over losing your parents or at 53 accepting the fact your never going to be as fit as you once were and illness is statistically catching you up as is ‘old age’.
Some of my mates don’t even think about the impending shit show of old age that is rapidly creeping their way.
 
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